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Dale W. Jorgenson

Dale W. Jorgenson is Samuel W. Morris University Professor of Economics at Harvard University.

Titles by This Author

Environmental Taxes and Fiscal Reform in the United States

Energy utilization, especially from fossil fuels, creates hidden costs in the form of pollution and environmental damages. The costs are well documented but are hidden in the sense that they occur outside the market, are not reflected in market prices, and are not taken into account by energy users. Double Dividend presents a novel method for designing environmental taxes that correct market prices so that they reflect the true cost of energy.

Information Technology and the American Growth Resurgence

The American economy has experienced renewed growth since 1995, with this surge rooted in the development and deployment of information technology (IT). This book traces the American growth resurgence to its sources within individual industries, documents the critical role of IT, and shows how U.S. investment in IT has important parallels in other developed countries.

Economic Growth in the Information Age

The relentless decline in the prices of information technology (IT) has steadily enhanced the role of IT investment as a source of economic growth in the United States. Productivity growth in IT-producing industries has gradually risen in importance, and a productivity revival has taken place in the rest of the economy. In this book Dale Jorgenson shows that IT provides the foundation for the resurgence of American economic growth.Information technology rests in turn on the development and deployment of semiconductors--transistors, storage devices, and microprocessors.

Lifting the Burden: Tax Reform, the Cost of Capital, and U.S. Economic Growth

This book presents a comprehensive treatment of the cost-of-capital approach for analyzing the economic impact of tax policy. This approach has provided an intellectual impetus for reforms of capital income taxation in the United States and around the world. The cost of capital and the marginal effective tax rate are combined with estimates of substitution possibilities by businesses and households in analyzing tax and spending programs. This makes it possible to evaluate tax reforms and changes in government spending.

Econometric Modeling of Producer Behavior

The objectives of econometric modeling of producer behavior are to determine the nature of substitution among inputs and outputs and of differences in technology, as well as the role of economies of scale in production. Recent advances in methodology, based on the dual formulation of the theory of production in terms of prices, have enabled econometricians to achieve these objectives more effectively. This volume summarizes the economic theory, the econometric methodology, and the empirical findings resulting from the new approach.

Energy, the Environment, and Economic Growth

Volume 1: Econometric General Equilibrium Modeling presents an econometric approach to general equilibrium modeling of the impact of economic policies. Earlier approaches were based on the "calibration" of general equilibrium models to a single data point. The obvious disadvantage of calibration is that it requires highly restrictive assumptions about technology and preferences, such as fixed input-output coefficients. These assumptions are contradicted by the massive evidence of energy conservation in response to higher world energy prices, beginning in 1973.

Econometric General Equilibrium Modeling

Volume 1: Econometric General Equilibrium Modeling presents an econometric approach to general equilibrium modeling of the impact of economic policies. Earlier approaches were based on the "calibration" of general equilibrium models to a single data point. The obvious disadvantage of calibration is that it requires highly restrictive assumptions about technology and preferences, such as fixed input-output coefficients. These assumptions are contradicted by the massive evidence of energy conservation in response to higher world energy prices, beginning in 1973.

Aggregate Consumer Behavior

This volume presents a new approach to econometric modeling of aggregate consumer behavior. The approach has successfully extricated demand modeling from the highly restrictive framework provided for more than half a century by the model of a representative consumer. Like the representative consumer model that preceded it, the new approach rests on the theory of individual behavior.

Measuring Social Welfare

This volume presents an approach to the evaluation of economic policies through the econometric modeling of aggregate consumer behavior. While the preferences of individual consumers are revealed by their market choices, these preferences can be recovered only by econometric methods, not through the index numbers used in the official statistics.

Tax Policy and the Cost of Capital


These studies of the cost of capital will inspire and guide policy-makers who share the goal of making the allocation of capital in a market economy more efficient.