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Gerhard Illing

Gerhard Illing is Professor of Economics at the University of Munich. He is the coeditor of Spectrum Auctions and Competition in Telecommunications (MIT Press, 2004).

Titles by This Editor

Digital technology has dramatically changed the structure of many industrial sectors. The rise of the Internet and increased broadband access have given rise to new business models and strategies for firms dealing with both electronic and physical goods. Industrial Organization and the Digital Economy focuses on changes in the two industries most affected by the new technology: software and music. The book offers the theoretical and factual grounding necessary for understanding the changes in industrial organization brought about by the digital economy, with the chapters together providing an accessible and interesting cross-fertilization of fact and theory. Moreover, two chapters demonstrate the relevance of the emerging literature on two-sided markets for the digital economy.The contributors consider such topics as the innovation value of software; empirical evidence and theoretical analysis regarding the impact of file sharing on music sales; the ability of firms to modify their products and offer them in different versions; the practice of preannouncing information goods; the effects of electronic commerce on both consumers and retailers; and price-setting by electronic mediators. The studies in Industrial Organization and the Digital Economy provide a valuable starting point for future research on other aspects of the subject, including the open-source movement and trust and reputation.Contributors:Paul Belleflamme, Jay Pil Choi, Emin M. Dinlersoz, David S. Evans, Chaim Fershtman, Neil Gandal, Amit Gayer, Andrei Hagiu, Gerhard Illing, Bruno Jullien, Eirik Gaard Kristiansen, Stan J. Liebowitz, Jae Nahm, Martin Peitz, Pedro Pereira, Richard Schmalensee, Oz Shy, Patrick Waelbroeck

In 2000 and 2001, several European countries carried out auctions for third generation technologies or universal mobile telephone services (UMTS) communication licenses. These "spectrum auctions" inaugurated yet another era in an industry that has already been transformed by a combination of staggering technological innovation and substantial regulatory change. Because of their spectacular but often puzzling outcomes, these spectrum auctions attracted enormous attention and invited new research on the interplay of auctions, industry dynamics, and regulation. This book collects essays on this topic by leading analysts of telecommunications and the European auction experience, all but one presented at a November 2001 CESifo conference; comments and responses are included as well, to preserve some of the controversy and atmosphere of give-and-take at the conference.

The essays show the interconnectedness of two important and productive areas of modern economics, auction theory and industrial organization. Because spectrum auctions are embedded in a dynamic interaction of consumers, firms, legislation, and regulation, a multidimensional approach yields important insights. The first essays discuss strategies of stimulating new competition and the complex interplay of the political process, regulation, and competition. The later essays focus on specific spectrum auctions. Combining the empirical data these auctions provide with recent advances in microeconomic theory, they examine questions of auction design and efficiency and convincingly explain the enormous variation of revenues in different auctions.