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James M. Poterba

James M. Poterba is Mitsui Professor in the Department of Economics at MIT. He has been Director of the NBER Public Economics Research Program since 1991 and has edited volumes 6-20 of Tax Policy and the Economy.

Titles by This Author

Dramatic advances in life expectancy mean that today's retirees must plan on living into their eighties, their nineties, and even beyond. Longer life expectancies are the symbol of a prosperous society, but this progress also means that some retirees will need to plan conservatively and cut back substantially on their living standards or risk living so long that they exhaust their resources. This book examines the role that life annuities can play in helping people protect themselves against such outcomes.

Titles by This Editor

This NBER series presents current academic research findings in the areas of taxation and government spending. The papers included provide important background information for policy analysts in government and the private sector without making specific policy recommendations. This twenty-first installment in the series reports on recent research concerning both taxation and social insurance policy.

This NBER series presents current academic research findings in the areas of taxation and government spending. The papers included provide important background information for policy analysts in government and the private sector without making specific policy recommendations.

Problems and Prospects

Colombia, once a model of fiscal discipline for other Latin American nations, has seen its fiscal situation deteriorate since the early 1990s. Higher government spending, taxes that did not keep pace with expenditures, and severe recession led to an unsustainable debt-to-GDP ratio of 52 percent in 2002. Short-term tax increases, even coupled with spending reforms, have not restored Colombia to fiscal balance.

This NBER series presents current academic research findings in the areas of taxation and government spending. The papers included provide important background information for policy analysts in government and the private sector without making specific policy recommendations.

This NBER series presents current academic research in the areas of taxation and government spending. The papers included provide important background information for policy analysis without making specific policy recommendations.

Volume 17 continues the series tradition of addressing topics that are relevant to current issues as well as longer-range concerns, with topics that include the fiscal implications of the No Child Left Behind Act, the 2001 Tax Rebate, and the tax burdens of multinational corporations.

This series publishes recent research on the economic effects of taxation and government expenditure programs, as well as studies of the distributional and incentive effects of current and proposed tax legislation. The research results are presented in a form that is accessible to tax practitioners and policymakers.

Based on a National Bureau of Economic Research conference, Tax and the Economy is a timely review of issues in the current tax Focusing on the economic effects of tax policies, written in a style accessible to policymakers, corporate managers, lawyers economists, each article demonstrates how economic research can an important contribution to tax policy debates.

This series presents recent research on the effects of taxation and government expenditure programs on economic performance and analyses of the effects of potential tax reforms. The research results appear in a form that is accessible to tax practitioners and policymakers.

This series presents recent research on the effects of taxation and government expenditure programs on economic performance and analyses of the effects of potential tax reforms. The research results appear in a form that is accessible to tax practitioners and policymakers.

This series presents recent research on the effects of taxation on economic performance and analyses of the effects of potential tax reforms. The research results appear in a form that is accessible to tax practitioners and policymakers.