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Linda M. Harasim

Linda Harasim is a Professor in the Department of Communications at Simon Fraser University.

Titles by This Author

A Field Guide to Teaching and Learning Online

Computer-Mediated Communication (CMC) technologies such as electronic mail, bulletin board services, computer conferencing systems, and the World Wide Web are having a profound effect on education. Learning Networks is a complete guide to the use of these new technologies at the primary, secondary, university, and adult education levels. Drawing on the authors' own considerable experience of teaching and learning online, it describes the learning networks that are available as well as new examples of learning networks that can be created.

Part I provides a selective survey of the field: what are learning networks and who is using them, what kind of courses can be taught online, what approaches to teaching and learning are most successful online, what curriculum can best be supported by networking, and what kinds of teachers and learners benefit from this medium. Part II deals exhaustively with the design and implementation of learning networks as well as the roles of teachers and learners and gives a realistic assessment of potential pitfalls. In Part III the authors discuss CMC technologies as a paradigm for education in the next century.

Computers and International Communication

Global Networks takes up the host of issues raised by the new networking technology that now links individuals, groups, and organizations in different countries and on different continents. The twenty-one contributions focus on the implementation, application, and impact of computer-mediated communication in a global context.

Previously limited to scientific research, global networks now have an impact on social, educational, and business communications. Individuals with a personal computer, a modem, and some simple software can join a new social community that is based on interest, not location. Global Networks, which was written largely with the assistance of the internet, provides an understanding of the issues, opportunities, and pitfalls of this new social connectivity. It looks at how -networking technology can support and augment communication and collaboration from such perspectives as policy constraints and opportunities, language differences, cross-cultural communication, and social network design.

Contributors: Linda M. Harasim. John Quarterman. Howard Rheingold. Anne Branscomb. Lee Sproull and Sara Kiesler. Marvin Manheim. Hiroshi Ishii. Jan Walls. Michael Kirby and Catherine Murray. Andrew Feenberg. Robin Mason. Margaret Riel. Beryl Bellman, Alex Jeffrey Shapard. Lucio Teles. Howard Frederick. Mitchell Kapor and Daniel Weitzner. Shumpei Kumon and lzurni Aizu. Robert Jacobson.