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Pablo De Greiff

Pablo De Greiff is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the State University of New York at Buffalo and Research Director of the International Center for Transitional Justice.

Titles by This Editor

If globalization is to be a benefit and not a burden to humankind, it must be governed by global institutions that are perceived by all people to be democratic and just. But before we can create such institutions, we must imagine them, and that requires a rethinking and extension of normative political theory. Global Justice and Transnational Politics encourages and advances that work.

The book's first part, "Weak Universalism," contains essays by Amartya Sen and Leif Wenar that offer constructive developments of John Rawls's statement of the principles a liberal polity might reasonably propose to govern its relations with other peoples. The second part, "Strong Universalism and Transnational Commitments," contains essays by Jürgen Habermas, David Luban, Martha Nussbaum, and Thomas Pogge examining the normative sources and possible types of cross-border commitments. In the third part, "Transnational Politics and National Identities," Habermas discusses the possibility of a democratic political order developing within the institutional framework of the European Union; Thomas McCarthy draws on Kant to show how cosmopolitanism might be reconciled with the legacy of nationalism; and Craig Calhoun tries to retrieve a positive aspect of the tradition of nationalism, namely that it provides large populations with a powerful way of imagining political community across space and time.

Studies in Political Theory

edited by Ciaran Cronin and Pablo De Greiff Since its appearance in English translation in 1996, J??rgen Habermas's Between Facts and Norms has become the focus of a productive dialogue between German and Anglo-American legal and political theorists. The present volume contains ten essays that provide an overview of Habermas's political thought since the original appearance of Between Facts and Norms in 1992 and extend his model of deliberative democracy in novel ways to issues untreated in the earlier work.Habermas's theory of democracy has at least three features that set it apart from competing positions. First, it combines a concern with questions of normative justification with an empirical analysis of the social conditions necessary for the realization of democratic institutions. Second, at the heart of his model is the assertion of an internal relationship between liberalism and democracy. On this account, the rights of the individual that are central to liberalism can be guaranteed only within a constitutional framework that at the same time fosters democratic rights of political participation through the public sphere. Finally, Habermas defends a conception of universal human rights that is not only sensitive to cultural differences but also calls for legal and political institutions that facilitate the cultivation of cultural and religious identities within pluralistic societies.These essays demonstrate the extraordinary power of Habermas's theory of democracy through a further engagement with Rawls's political liberalism and through original contributions to current debates over nationalism, multiculturalism, and the viability of supranational political institutions.