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Robert J. Sternberg

Titles by This Editor

Most cognitive psychology texts are organized around empirical findings on standard substantive topics such as perception, memory, vision, and language. This book is the first to introduce the study of cognition in terms of the major conceptual themes that underlie virtually all the substantive topics. Taking a dialectical approach, the chapters contrast alternative approaches to the underlying themes (e.g., domain-generality vs. domain-specificity), then show how a synthesis of the two approaches provides the best understanding.

The book is organized into six sections: general issues in cognition, representation and process in cognition, methodology in cognition, kinds of cognition, group and individual differences in cognition, and a conclusion.

Contributors: Rhianon Allen, Axel Buchner, Patricia A. Carpenter, Stephen J. Ceci, Michael Cole, Eduardus DeBruyn, Randall W. Engle, Peter A. Frensch, Elena L. Grigorenko, Earl Hunt, P. N. Johnson-Laird, Marcel Adam Just, Michael Kahana, John F. Kihlstrom, Geoffrey Loftus, Valerie S. Makin, Timothy P. McNamara, Thomas O. Nelson, Raymond S. Nickerson, Natalie Oransky, Elizabeth A. Phelps, Dennis R. Proffitt, Arthur S. Reber, Paul J. Reber, Daniel N. Robinson, Tina B. Rosenblum, Brian H. Ross, Steven Sloman, Robert J. Sternberg.

A Bradford Book


The Nature of Insight brings together diverse perspectives, including recent theories and discoveries, to examine the nature and origins of insightful thinking, as well as the history of theory and research on the topic and the methods used to study it. There are chapters by the leading experts in this field, including Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Ronald Finke, Howard Gruber, Marcel Just, David Meyer, David Perkins, Dean Simonton, and Robert Weisberg, among others.

The Nature of Insight is divided into five main parts. Following an introduction that reviews the history and methods of the field, part II looks at how people solve challenging puzzles whose answers cannot be obtained through ordinary means. Part III focuses on how people come up with ideas for new inventions, while part IV explores the thinking of some of the most insightful people in the history of civilization. Part V considers metaphors such as evolution and investment as bases for understanding insight. An epilogue integrates all these approaches.

Contributors: R. E. Mayer. R. L. Dominowski and P. Dallob. C. M. Seifert, D. E. Meyer, N. Davidson, A. J. Patalano, and I. Yaniv. J. E. Davidson. R. W. Weisberg. M. L. Gick and R. S. Lockhart. S. M. Smith. R. A. Finke. M. I. Isaak and M. A. Just. M. Csikszentmihalyi and K. Sawyer. K. Dunbar. H. E. Gruber. M. F. Ippolito and R. D. Tweney. D. K. Simonton. D. N. Perkins. R. J. Sternberg and T. I. Lubart.

A Bradford Book