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Sabeth Buchmann

Sabeth Buchmann is Professor of Modern and Postmodern Art at the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna (Institute for Art Theory and Cultural Studies).

Titles by This Author

Block-Experiments in Cosmococa—Program in Progress

Hélio Oiticica (1937–1980) occupies a central position in the Latin American avant-garde of the postwar era. Associated with the Rio de Janeiro-based neo-concretist movement at the beginning of his career, Oiticica moved from object production to the creation of chromatically opulent and sensually engulfing large-scale installations or wearable garments. Building on the idea for a film by Brazilian underground filmmaker Neville D’Almeida, Oiticica developed the concept for Block-Experiments in Cosmococa—Program in Progress (1973–1974) as an “open program”: a series of nine proposals for environments, each consisting of slide projections, soundtracks, leisure facilities, drawings (with cocaine used as pigment), and instructions for visitors. It is the epitome of what the artist called his “quasi-cinema” work—his most controversial production, and perhaps his most direct effort to merge art and life. Presented publicly for the first time in 1992, these works have been included in major international exhibitions in Los Angeles, Chicago, London, and New York.

Drawing on unpublished primary sources, letters, and writings by Oiticica himself, this illustrated examination of Oiticica’s work considers the vast catalog of theoretical references the artist’s work relies on, from anticolonial materialism to French phenomenology and postmodern media theory to the work of Jean-Luc Godard, Andy Warhol, and Brazilian avant-garde filmmakers. It discusses Oiticica’s work in relation to the diaspora of Brazilian intellectuals during the military dictatorship, the politics of media circulation, the commercialization of New York’s queer underground, the explicit use of cocaine as means of production, and possible future reappraisals of Oiticica’s work.

Titles by This Editor

Art After Conceptual Art tracks the various legacies of conceptualist practice over the past three decades. The anthology introduces and develops the idea that Conceptual art generated several different, and even contradictory, forms of art practice. Whereas some of these art modes contested commonplace assumptions of what art is, others served to buttress those beliefs. The bulk of the volume features newly written and highly innovative essays challenging standard historicizations of the legacy of Conceptualism, as well as the critical impact of these art practices on art since the 1970s. The essays explore topics as diverse as the interrelationships between Conceptualism and institutional critique, neoexpressionist painting and conceptualist paradigms, Conceptual art's often-ignored complicity with design and commodity culture, the specific forms of identity politics taken up by the reception of Conceptual art, and Conceptualism's North/South and East/West dynamics. A few texts that continue to be crucial for critical debates within the fields of conceptual and postconceptual art practice, history, and theory have been reprinted in order to convey the vibrant and ongoing discussion on the status of art after Conceptual art. The present volume aims to trigger an exploration of the relationship between postconceptualist practices and the beginnings of contemporary art.

The Generali Foundation Collection Series introduces important themes from this collection of contemporary art, without dealing explicitly with the collected artworks. Instead, it explores those discourses that have been crucial for the formation of art practices central to the Generali Foundation Collection. Furthermore, it makes visible their social, historical, and theoretical contexts, and the relevant shifts and disruptions within them.

Distributed for the Generali Foundation, Vienna