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Architecture in Search of Itself

A BIT of Architect?

From an essential text for the aspiring architect, this BIT offers realistic, unvarnished advice. A practicing architect and planner, professor of architecture, and architecture columnist offers reasons for becoming an architect (including “creative and intellectual fulfillment,” “love of drawing—without a computer,” and “immortality”) as well as reasons for not becoming an architect (including “lack of work,” “competition,” and “ego vulnerability”).

A BIT of Artificial Love
In his writing, the architect Paul Shepheard examines old assumptions about architecture and replaces the critical theory of the academic with the active theory of the architect-citizen enamored of the world around him. In this BIT, he takes Thanksgiving Day as an opportunity to reflect on the diaspora of his family and the evolution of human emotional bonds; and, conducting a seminar, he wonders how philosophy became part of architecture. 
 
A BIT of Architecture Depends
The architect and critic Jeremy Till offers a proposal for rescuing architects from themselves: a way to bridge the gap between what architecture actually is and what architects want it to be. In this BIT, Till discusses how to allow time into architecture, transcending false notions of eternity and the eternal now. 
 
A BIT of Down Detour Road
The new generation of architects faces a cold reality of economic and ecological crises. Architects may assure each other of their own importance, but society has come to view architecture as a luxury it can do without. For Eric Cesal, this recognition becomes an occasion to rethink architecture and its value from the very core. In this BIT, Cesal considers the economics of architecture and why an architect needs to know about finance as well as about buildings. 
 
A BIT of Toward a Minor Architecture
Jill Stoner’s architect’s eye tracks differently from most, drawn not to the lauded and iconic but to what she calls “the landscape of our constructed mistakes”—metropolitan hinterlands rife with failed and foreclosed developments, undersubscribed office parks, chain hotels, and abandoned malls. In this BIT, Stoner introduces the idea of “minor architectures” that emerge from the bottoms of power structures and within the language of those structures.