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Paperback | $38.00 Short | £30.95 | ISBN: 9780262522137 | 413 pp. | 6 x 8.7 in | May 1996
 

Instructor Resources

Debating the Democratic Peace

Overview

Are democracies less likely to go to war than other kinds of states? This question is of tremendous importance in both academic and policy-making circles and one that has been debated by political scientists for years. The Clinton administration, in particular, has argued that the United States should endeavor to promote democracy around the world. This timely reader includes some of the most influential articles in the debate that have appeared in the journal International Security during the past two years, adding two seminal pieces published elsewhere to make a more balanced and complete collection, suitable for classroom use.

About the Editors

Michael E. Brown is Dean of the Elliott School of International Affairs at George Washington University.

Sean M. Lynn-Jones is Editor of International Security, the International Security Program's quarterly journal. He is also series editor of the Belfer Center Studies in International Security, the Program's book series that is published by MIT Press.

Steven E. Miller is Editor-in-chief of International Security and Director of the International Security Program at the Belfer Center.

Endorsements

"Extremely useful ... excellent."
Francis Fukuyama, Foreign Affairs

"The democratic peace thesis is one of the most significant propositions to come out of social science in recent decades. If true, it has crucially important implications for both theory and policy. Debating the Democratic Peace provides a comprehensive collection of the major writings on all sides of this issue."
Samuel P. Huntington, Harvard University