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Hardcover | $58.00 Short | £39.95 | ISBN: 9780262015080 | 504 pp. | 7 x 9 in | 74 b&w illus., 42, tables| March 2011
 
Ebook | $58.00 Short | ISBN: 9780262310581 | 504 pp. | 7 x 9 in | 74 b&w illus., 42, tables| March 2011
 

Knowledge Management in Theory and Practice, second edition

Overview

The ability to manage knowledge has become increasingly important in today’s knowledge economy. Knowledge is considered a valuable commodity, embedded in products and in the tacit knowledge of highly mobile individual employees. Knowledge management (KM) represents a deliberate and systematic approach to cultivating and sharing an organization’s knowledge base. It is a highly multidisciplinary field that encompasses both information technology and intellectual capital. This textbook and professional reference offers a comprehensive overview of the field of KM, providing both a substantive theoretical grounding and a pragmatic approach to applying key concepts. Drawing on ideas, tools, and techniques from such disciplines as sociology, cognitive science, organizational behavior, and information science, the text describes KM theory and practice at the individual, community, and organizational levels. It offers illuminating case studies and vignettes from companies including IBM, Xerox, British Telecommunications, JP Morgan Chase, and Nokia. This second edition has been updated and revised throughout. New material has been added on the information and library science perspectives, taxonomies and knowledge classification, the media richness of the knowledge-sharing channel, e-learning, social networking in KM contexts, strategy tools, results-based outcome assessments, knowledge continuity and organizational learning models, KM job descriptions, copyleft and Creative Commons, and other topics. New case studies and vignettes have been added; and the references and glossary have been updated and expanded.

Downloadable instructor resources available for this title: lecture slides, file of figures in the book, course outlines, assignments, and case studies

About the Author

Kimiz Dalkir is Associate Professor at McGill University’s Graduate School of Information and Library Studies. A practitioner in the field for seventeen years, she has advised more than twenty companies on the design, development, and evaluation of knowledge-based systems.

Table of Contents

  • Knowledge Management in Theory and Practice
  • Knowledge Management in Theory and Practice
  • Second Edition
  • Kimiz Dalkir
  • foreword by Jay Liebowitz
  • The MIT Press
  • Cambridge, Massachusetts
  • London, England
  • © 2011
  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form by any electronic or mechanical means (including photocopying, recording, or information storage and retrieval) without permission in writing from the publisher.
  • For information about special quantity discounts, please e-mail special_sales@mitpress.mit.edu
  • This book was set in Stone Sans and Stone by Toppan Best-set Premedia Limited. Printed and bound in the United States of America.
  • Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data
  • Dalkir, Kimiz.
  • Knowledge management in theory and practice / Kimiz Dalkir ; foreword by Jay Liebowitz. — 2nd ed.
  •  p. cm.
  • Includes bibliographical references and index.
  • ISBN 978-0-262-01508-0 (hardcover : alk. paper)
  • 1. Knowledge management. I. Title.
  • HD30.2.D354 2011
  • 658.4'038—dc22
  • 2010026273
  • 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
  • Contents
  • Foreword: Can Knowledge Management Survive? xiii
  • Jay Liebowitz
  • 1 Introduction to Knowledge Management 1
  • Learning Objectives 1
  • Introduction 2
  • What Is Knowledge Management? 5
  • Multidisciplinary Nature of KM 8
  • The Two Major Types of Knowledge: Tacit and Explicit 9
  • Concept Analysis Technique 11
  • History of Knowledge Management 15
  • From Physical Assets to Knowledge Assets 19
  • Organizational Perspectives on Knowledge Management 21
  • Library and Information Science (LIS) Perspectives on KM 22
  • Why Is KM Important Today? 22
  • KM for Individuals, Communities, and Organizations 25
  • Key Points 26
  • Discussion Points 27
  • References 27
  • 2 The Knowledge Management Cycle 31
  • Learning Objectives 31
  • Introduction 32
  • Major Approaches to the KM Cycle 33
  • The Meyer and Zack KM Cycle 33
  • The Bukowitz and Williams KM Cycle 38
  • The McElroy KM Cycle 42
  • The Wiig KM Cycle 45
  • An Integrated KM Cycle 51
  • Strategic Implications of the KM Cycle 54
  • Practical Considerations for Managing Knowledge 57
  • Key Points 57
  • Discussion Points 57
  • References 58
  • 3 Knowledge Management Models 59
  • Learning Objectives 59
  • Introduction 59
  • Major Theoretical KM Models 62
  • The Von Krogh and Roos Model of Organizational Epistemology 62
  • The Nonaka and Takeuchi Knowledge Spiral Model 64
  • The Choo Sense-Making KM Model 73
  • The Wiig Model for Building and Using Knowledge 76
  • The Boisot I-Space KM Model 82
  • Complex Adaptive System Models of KM 85
  • The European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM) KM Model 89
  • The inukshuk KM Model 90
  • Strategic Implications of KM Models 92
  • Practical Implications of KM Models 92
  • Key Points 93
  • Discussion Points 93
  • References 95
  • 4 Knowledge Capture and Codification 97
  • Learning Objectives 97
  • Introduction 98
  • Tacit Knowledge Capture 101
  • Tacit Knowledge Capture at the Individual and Group Levels 102
  • Tacit Knowledge Capture at the Organizational Level 118
  • Explicit Knowledge Codification 121
  • Cognitive Maps 121
  • Decision Trees 123
  • Knowledge Taxonomies 124
  • The Relationships among Knowledge Management, Competitive Intelligence, Business Intelligence, and Strategic Intelligence 131
  • Strategic Implications of Knowledge Capture and Codification 133
  • Practical Implications of Knowledge Capture and Codification 134
  • Key Points 135
  • Discussion Points 135
  • References 136
  • 5 Knowledge Sharing and Communities of Practice 141
  • Learning Objectives 141
  • Introduction 142
  • The Social Nature of Knowledge 147
  • Sociograms and Social Network Analysis 149
  • Community Yellow Pages 152
  • Knowledge-Sharing Communities 154
  • Types of Communities 158
  • Roles and Responsibilities in CoPs 160
  • Knowledge Sharing in Virtual CoPs 163
  • Obstacles to Knowledge Sharing 168
  • The Undernet 169
  • Organizational Learning and Social Capital 170
  • Measuring the Value of Social Capital 171
  • Strategic Implications of Knowledge Sharing 173
  • Practical Implications of Knowledge Sharing 175
  • Key Points 175
  • Discussion Points 176
  • References 177
  • 6 Knowledge Application 183
  • Learning Objectives 183
  • Introduction 184
  • Knowledge Application at the Individual Level 187
  • Characteristics of Individual Knowledge Workers 187
  • Bloom’s Taxonomy of Learning Objectives 191
  • Task Analysis and Modeling 200
  • Knowledge Application at the Group and Organizational Levels 207
  • Knowledge Reuse 211
  • Knowledge Repositories 213
  • E-Learning and Knowledge Management Application 214
  • Strategic Implications of Knowledge Application 216
  • Practical Implications of Knowledge Application 217
  • Key Points 218
  • Discussion Points 218
  • Note 219
  • References 219
  • 7 The Role of Organizational Culture 223
  • Learning Objectives 223
  • Introduction 224
  • Different Types of Cultures 227
  • Organizational Culture Analysis 229
  • Culture at the Foundation of KM 232
  • The Effects of Culture on Individuals 235
  • Organizational Maturity Models 238
  • KM Maturity Models 239
  • CoP Maturity Models 244
  • Transformation to a Knowledge-Sharing Culture 246
  • Impact of a Merger on Culture 256
  • Impact of Virtualization on Culture 258
  • Strategic Implications of Organizational Culture 258
  • Practical Implications of Organizational Culture 259
  • Key Points 262
  • Discussion Points 262
  • References 263
  • 8 Knowledge Management Tools 267
  • Learning Objectives 267
  • Introduction 268
  • Knowledge Capture and Creation Tools 270
  • Content Creation Tools 270
  • Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery 271
  • Blogs 274
  • Mashups 275
  • Content Management Tools 276
  • Folksonomies and Social Tagging/Bookmarking 277
  • Personal Knowledge Management (PKM) 279
  • Knowledge Sharing and Dissemination Tools 280
  • Groupware and Collaboration Tools 281
  • Wikis 285
  • Social Networking, Web 2.0, and KM 2.0 288
  • Networking Technologies 292
  • Knowledge Acquisition and Application Tools 297
  • Intelligent Filtering Tools 298
  • Adaptive Technologies 302
  • Strategic Implications of KM Tools and Techniques 303
  • Practical Implications of KM Tools and Techniques 304
  • Key Points 304
  • Discussion Points 305
  • References 306
  • 9 Knowledge Management Strategy 311
  • Learning Objectives 311
  • Introduction 311
  • Developing a Knowledge Management Strategy 316
  • Knowledge Audit 318
  • Gap Analysis 322
  • The KM Strategy Road Map 325
  • Balancing Innovation and Organizational Structure 328
  • Types of Knowledge Assets Produced 333
  • Key Points 336
  • Discussion Points 337
  • References 338
  • 10 The Value of Knowledge Management 339
  • Learning Objectives 339
  • Introduction 339
  • KM Return on Investment (ROI) and Metrics 343
  • The Benchmarking Method 345
  • The Balanced Scorecard Method 351
  • The House of Quality Method 354
  • The Results-Based Assessment Framework 356
  • Measuring the Success of Communities of Practice 359
  • Key Points 360
  • Discussion Points 362
  • References 362
  • Additional Resources 364
  • 11 Organizational Learning and Organizational Memory 365
  • Learning Objectives 365
  • Introduction 365
  • How do Organizations Learn and Remember? 368
  • Frameworks to Assess Organizational Learning and Organizational Memory 369
  • The Management of Organizational Memory 370
  • Organizational Learning 377
  • The Lessons Learned Process 378
  • Organizational Learning and Organizational Memory Models 379
  • A Three-Tiered Approach to Knowledge Continuity 385
  • Key Points 390
  • Discussion Points 391
  • References 392
  • 12 The KM Team 397
  • Learning Objectives 397
  • Introduction 398
  • Major Categories of KM Roles 402
  • Senior Management Roles 403
  • KM Roles and Responsibilities within Organizations 410
  • The KM Profession 412
  • The Ethics of KM 413
  • Key Points 419
  • Discussion Points 420
  • Note 421
  • References 421
  • 13 Future Challenges for KM 423
  • Learning Objectives 423
  • Introduction 424
  • Political Issues Regarding Internet Search Engines 425
  • The Politics of Organizational Context and Culture 427
  • Shift to Knowledge-Based Assets 429
  • Intellectual Property Issues 433
  • How to Provide Incentives for Knowledge Sharing 435
  • Future Challenges for KM 440
  • KM Research 442
  • A Postmodern KM 446
  • Concluding Thought 447
  • Key Points 448
  • Discussion Points 449
  • References 450
  • 14 KM Resources 453
  • The Classics 453
  • KM for Specific Disciplines 454
  • International KM 455
  • KM Journals 455
  • Key Conferences 456
  • Key Web Sites 457
  • KM Glossaries 457
  • KM Case Studies and Examples 458
  • KM Case Studies 458
  • KM Examples 459
  • KM Wikis 459
  • KM Blogs 459
  • Visual Resources 460
  • YouTube 460
  • Other Visual Resources 460
  • Some Useful Tools 460
  • Other Visual Mapping Tools 460
  • Note 460
  • Glossary 461
  • Index 477

Endorsements

""Knowledge Management in Theory and Practice provides an extensive and highly valuable compendium and guide for KM practitioners and educators, and for business managers as well. Since the first edition of this book, many organizations have adopted KM methods and gained experience with approaches that work – and with those that don’t. Dalkir shows convincingly why KM must be multidisciplinary and how it strengthens strategic and operational management when it builds bridges between technology and the social, intangible features of organizations. This is an ideal graduate textbook."
Karl M. Wiig , Chairman and CEO, Knowledge Research Institute, Inc.