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Hardcover | $52.00 Short | £35.95 | ISBN: 9780262016438 | 464 pp. | 7 x 9 in | 52 b&w illus.| October 2011
 
Ebook | $37.00 Short | ISBN: 9780262299381 | 464 pp. | 7 x 9 in | 52 b&w illus.| October 2011
 

Neural Basis of Motivational and Cognitive Control

Overview

This volume offers a range of perspectives on a simple problem: How does the brain choose efficiently and adaptively among options to ensure coherent, goal-directed behavior? The contributors, from fields as varied as anatomy, psychology, learning theory, neuroimaging, neurophysiology, behavioral economics, and computational modeling, present an overview of key approaches in the study of cognitive control and decision making. The book not only presents a survey of cutting-edge research on the topic, it also provides a handbook useful to psychologists, biologists, economists, and neuroscientists alike.

The contributors consider such topics as the anatomical and physiological basis of control, examining core components of the control system, including contributions of the cerebral cortex, the ways in which subcortical brain regions underpin the control functions of the cortex, and neurotransmitter systems; variations in control seen in the development from adolescence to adulthood, in healthy adults, and in patient populations; recent developments in computational approaches, including reinforcement learning; and overarching trends in the current literature, including neuroeconomics, social decision making, and model-based approaches to data from neuroimaging and electrophysiology.

About the Editors

Rogier B. Mars is a Research Fellow in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the Centre for Functional MRI of the Brain at Oxford University.

Jérôme Sallet is a Research Fellow in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the Centre for Functional MRI of the Brain at Oxford University.

Matthew F. S. Rushworth is Professor in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the Centre for Functional MRI of the Brain at Oxford University.

Nick Yeung is University Lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the Centre for Functional MRI of the Brain at Oxford University.