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History and Foundations of Information Science

This new series of books focuses on the historical approach or theoretical approach to information science and seeks a broader interpretation of what we consider as information (i.e., information is in the eye of the beholder, be it sets of data, scholarly publications, works of art, material objects, or DNA samples), and an emphasis upon how people access and interact with this information.

The Subject in the Age of Documentation, Information, and Data

A critical history of the modern tradition of documentation, tracing the representation of individuals and groups in the form of documents, information, and data.

From Index Cards to Dewey Decimals to Alger Hiss

An account of Herbert Field’s quest for a new way of organizing information and how information systems are produced by ideology as well as technology.

The Culture of Wikipedia

How Wikipedia collaboration addresses the challenges of openness, consensus, and leadership in a historical pursuit for a universal encyclopedia.

About Cards & Catalogs, 1548-1929

Why the card catalog--a “paper machine” with rearrangeable elements--can be regarded as a precursor of the computer.

An overview of information retrieval rooted in the humanities and social sciences but informed by an understanding of information technology and information theory.