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October Books

Founded in 1989, OCTOBER Books provides a forum for critical engagement with crucial moments in the development of the historical and contemporary avant-gardes. Building on the important role the journal played in introducing poststructural theory to the American art world, OCTOBER offers a platform for the innovative work of scholars today.

Models and Methods in Twentieth-Century Art

Essays spanning three decades by one of the most rigorous art thinkers of our time grapple with formal and historical paradigms in twentieth century art.

The Rehumanization of Art and Literature

The paradox at the heart of the return to realism in the interwar years, as seen in work by Moholy-Nagy, Brecht, and others.

Between Utopia and Kitsch

A new view of Fontana showing how the artist combined modernist aesthetics with outmoded forms of kitsch.

Marcel Broodthaers, 1964–1976

A provocative investigation of Marcel Broodthaers’s work as a reflection on the uses and abuses of language.

European Avant-Garde Film of the 1920s

The complex stance toward modernity taken by 1920s avant-garde cinema, as exemplified by five major films.

The Writings of Thomas Hirschhorn

Writings by Thomas Hirschhorn, collected for the first time, trace the development of the artist’s ideas and artistic strategies.

In essays that span three decades, one of contemporary art’s most esteemed critics celebrates artists who have persevered in the service of a medium.

A new perspective on the enormously influential but insufficiently understood work of San Francisco-based artist Bruce Conner (1933–2008).

Yvonne Rainer and the 1960s

How Yvonne Rainer’s art shaped new ways of watching as well as performing; how it connected 1960s avant-garde art to politics and activism.

Reinventing the Language of Contestation in Postwar France, 1945–1968

How culture became a field of struggle over meaning in France: the appropriation of elements from advertising, journalism, and other sources to serve political ends in art, film, and the activities of the French left, culminating in the upheavals of May 1968.

Francis Picabia and Dada in Paris

A new theory of the readymade via a new reading of Picabia and a new writing of Dada.

Television against Democracy

In a world where politics is conducted through images, the tools of art history can be used to challenge the privatized antidemocratic sphere of American television.

Roy Lichtenstein and the Face of Painting in the 1960s

A sustained study of Lichtenstein’s pop oeuvre, offering new readings of such canonical works as Look Mickey and Happy Tears.

Used Paint

This first book-length study of Robert Ryman argues that his work is a continuous experiment in the possibilities of painting.

Louise Bourgeois and a Story of Modern Art
Robert Rauschenberg and the Neo-Avant-Garde

Artists, art historians, and critics look at the legacies of feminism and critical theory in the work of women artists, more than thirty years after the beginning of the modern women's movement and Linda Nochlin's landmark essay "Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?"

Selected Writings, 1975–2001
Writings, Interviews, Bits, Pages
Essays on European and American Art from 1955 to 1975

Eighteen essays written by Buchloh over the last twenty years, each looking at a single artist within the framework of specific theoretical and historical questions.

Attention, Spectacle, and Modern Culture

Suspensions of Perception decisively relocates the problem of aesthetic contemplation within a broader collective encounter with the unstable nature of perception—in psychology, philosophy, neurology, early cinema, and photography.

Marcel Duchamp 1910-1941

In Infinite Regress, David Joselit considers the plurality of identities and practices within Duchamp's life and art between 1910 and 1941, conducting a synthetic reading of his early and middle career.

These essays on nine women artists are framed by the question, born of feminism, "What evaluative criteria can be applied to women's art?"

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