Skip navigation

Computer Music

  • Page 4 of 4
  •  
Selected Readings from Computer Music Journal
Edited by Curtis Roads

Since its inception in 1976, Computer Music Journal has led the field as the essential resource for musicians, composers, scientists, engineers, and computer enthusiasts interested in contemporary electronic music and computer-generated sound.

In The Music Machine, Curtis Roads brings together 53 classic articles published in Computer Music Journal between 1980 and 1985, providing a cohesive survey of the major developments in computer music and in the related technology during the last decade. The book includes interviews with major figures in the field and articles devoted to composition, artificial intelligence, and the popular Music Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI). Roads has written an overview of each of the book's seven parts, highlighting the major topics and placing the various articles in a thematic and historical context.

Curtis Roads is a composer, a producer, and associate editor of Computer Music Journal.

Perspectives on Music Cognition

This anthology provides an informative and timely introduction to ongoing research on music as a cognitive process, bringing a new coherence to the emerging science of musical activity.

Following the foreword, which is based on a conversation with Marvin Minsky, 26 contributions explore musical composition, analysis, performance, perception, and learning and tutoring. Their goal is to discover how these activities can be interpreted, understood, modeled, and supported through the use of computer programs. Each chapter is put into perspective by the editors, and empirical investigations are framed by a discussion of the nature of cognitive musicology and of epistemological problems of modeling musical action.

The contributions, drawn from two international workshops on AI and Music held in 1988 and 1989, are grouped in seven sections. Topics in these sections take up two views of the nature of cognitive musicology (Kugel, Laske), principles of modeling musical activity (Balaban, Bel, Blevis, Glasgow and Jenkins, Courtot, Smoliar), approaches to music composition (Ames and Domino, Laske, Marsella, Riecken), music analysis by synthesis (Cope, Ebcioglu, Maxwell), realtime performance of music (Bel and Kippen, Ohteru and Hashimoto), music perception (Desain and Honing, Jones, Miller and Scarborough, Linster), and learning/tutoring (Baker, Widmer).

M. Balaban is Senior Lecturer in the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science at Ben-Gurion University. K. Ebcioglu is Research Scientist in the Computer Sciences Department, IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center. 0. Laske is a composer and President of NEWCOMP, Inc., The New England Computer Arts Association, Inc.

Musical Applications of Object-Oriented Software Technology
Edited by Stephen Pope

Object-oriented programming (OOP) is perhaps the most important new software engineering technology of the past decade and promises to be a key factor in much of the software of the 1990s. This edited collection of articles from Computer Music Journal provides a timely and convenient source of tutorials on OOP languages and software design techniques and surveys a wide range of existing applications of this technology to music and digital signal processing. Included are the popular OOP languages LISP, Smalltalk-80, and Objective-C, and applications such as music description and composition, real-time performance, and digital signal processing.

Contents. Introduction. Tutorials and Technology. Machine Tongues VIII: The Design of a Smalltalk Music System, Glenn E. Krasner. Machine Tongues IX: Object­Oriented Programming, Henry Lieberman. Machine Tongues XI: Object-Oriented Software Design, Stephen Pope. Music Representation and Processing Tools. Flavors Band: A Language for Specifying Musical Style, Christopher Fry. FORMES: Composition and Scheduling of Processes, Xavier Roder and Pierre Cointe. An Introduction to the MODE System - A Musical Object Development Environment, Stephen Pope. An Overview of the Sound and Music Kits for the NeXT Computer, David Jaffe and Lee Boynton. Composition Systems. The Kyma/Platypus Computer Music Workstation, Carla Scaletti. An Introduction to the Creation Station, Henry Flurry. TTrees: A Tool for the Compositional Environment, Glendon Diener. Signal Processing Systems. Javelina: An Environment for Digital Signal Processor Software Development, Kurt Hebel. Virtual Digital Signal Processing in an ObjectOriented System, David Mellinger, Guy Garnett, and Bernard Mont-Reynaud.

This survey chronicles the major advances in computer music that have changed the way music is composed, performed, and recorded. It contains many of the classic, seminal articles in the field (most of which are now out of print) in revised and updated versions. Computer music pioneers, digital audio specialists, and highly knowledgeable practitioners have contributed to the book. Thirty-six articles written in the 1970s and 1980s cover sound synthesis techniques, synthesizer hardware and engineering, software systems for music, and perception and digital signal processing. The editors have provided extensive summaries for each section.

Curtis Roads is editor of Computer Music Journal. John Strawn is a Research Associate at the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA) at Stanford University.

  • Page 4 of 4
  •