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Scientific & Engineering Computation

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We now know that there is much more to classical mechanics than previously suspected. Derivations of the equations of motion, the focus of traditional presentations of mechanics, are just the beginning. This innovative textbook, now in its second edition, concentrates on developing general methods for studying the behavior of classical systems, whether or not they have a symbolic solution. It focuses on the phenomenon of motion and makes extensive use of computer simulation in its explorations of the topic. It weaves recent discoveries in nonlinear dynamics throughout the text, rather than presenting them as an afterthought. Explorations of phenomena such as the transition to chaos, nonlinear resonances, and resonance overlap to help the student develop appropriate analytic tools for understanding. The book uses computation to constrain notation, to capture and formalize methods, and for simulation and symbolic analysis. The requirement that the computer be able to interpret any expression provides the student with strict and immediate feedback about whether an expression is correctly formulated.

This second edition has been updated throughout, with revisions that reflect insights gained by the authors from using the text every year at MIT. In addition, because of substantial software improvements, this edition provides algebraic proofs of more generality than those in the previous edition; this improvement permeates the new edition.

Computing is usually viewed as a technology field that advances at the breakneck speed of Moore’s Law. If we turn away even for a moment, we might miss a game-changing technological breakthrough or an earthshaking theoretical development. This book takes a different perspective, presenting computing as a science governed by fundamental principles that span all technologies. Computer science is a science of information processes. We need a new language to describe the science, and in this book Peter Denning and Craig Martell offer the great principles framework as just such a language. This is a book about the whole of computing—its algorithms, architectures, and designs.

Denning and Martell divide the great principles of computing into six categories: communication, computation, coordination, recollection, evaluation, and design. They begin with an introduction to computing, its history, its many interactions with other fields, its domains of practice, and the structure of the great principles framework. They go on to examine the great principles in different areas: information, machines, programming, computation, memory, parallelism, queueing, and design. Finally, they apply the great principles to networking, the Internet in particular.

Great Principles of Computing will be essential reading for professionals in science and engineering fields with a “computational” branch, for practitioners in computing who want overviews of less familiar areas of computer science, and for non-computer science majors who want an accessible entry way to the field.

Portable Parallel Programming with the Message-Passing Interface

This book offers a thoroughly updated guide to the MPI (Message-Passing Interface) standard library for writing programs for parallel computers. Since the publication of the previous edition of Using MPI, parallel computing has become mainstream. Today, applications run on computers with millions of processors; multiple processors sharing memory and multicore processors with multiple hardware threads per core are common. The MPI-3 Forum recently brought the MPI standard up to date with respect to developments in hardware capabilities, core language evolution, the needs of applications, and experience gained over the years by vendors, implementers, and users. This third edition of Using MPI reflects these changes in both text and example code.

The book takes an informal, tutorial approach, introducing each concept through easy-to-understand examples, including actual code in C and Fortran. Topics include using MPI in simple programs, virtual topologies, MPI datatypes, parallel libraries, and a comparison of MPI with sockets. For the third edition, example code has been brought up to date; applications have been updated; and references reflect the recent attention MPI has received in the literature. A companion volume, Using Advanced MPI, covers more advanced topics, including hybrid programming and coping with large data.

Modern Features of the Message-Passing Interface

This book offers a practical guide to the advanced features of the MPI (Message-Passing Interface) standard library for writing programs for parallel computers. It covers new features added in MPI-3, the latest version of the MPI standard, and updates from MPI-2. Like its companion volume, Using MPI, the book takes an informal, example-driven, tutorial approach. The material in each chapter is organized according to the complexity of the programs used as examples, starting with the simplest example and moving to more complex ones.

Using Advanced MPI covers major changes in MPI-3, including changes to remote memory access and one-sided communication that simplify semantics and enable better performance on modern hardware; new features such as nonblocking and neighborhood collectives for greater scalability on large systems; and minor updates to parallel I/O and dynamic processes. It also covers support for hybrid shared-memory/message-passing programming; MPI_Message, which aids in certain types of multithreaded programming; features that handle very large data; an interface that allows the programmer and the developer to access performance data; and a new binding of MPI to Fortran.

A Gentle Introduction

The combination of two of the twentieth century’s most influential and revolutionary scientific theories, information theory and quantum mechanics, gave rise to a radically new view of computing and information. Quantum information processing explores the implications of using quantum mechanics instead of classical mechanics to model information and its processing. Quantum computing is not about changing the physical substrate on which computation is done from classical to quantum but about changing the notion of computation itself, at the most basic level. The fundamental unit of computation is no longer the bit but the quantum bit or qubit. This comprehensive introduction to the field offers a thorough exposition of quantum computing and the underlying concepts of quantum physics, explaining all the relevant mathematics and offering numerous examples. With its careful development of concepts and thorough explanations, the book makes quantum computing accessible to students and professionals in mathematics, computer science, and engineering. A reader with no prior knowledge of quantum physics (but with sufficient knowledge of linear algebra) will be able to gain a fluent understanding by working through the book.

Complex communicating computer systems—computers connected by data networks and in constant communication with their environments—do not always behave as expected. This book introduces behavioral modeling, a rigorous approach to behavioral specification and verification of concurrent and distributed systems. It is among the very few techniques capable of modeling systems interaction at a level of abstraction sufficient for the interaction to be understood and analyzed. Offering both a mathematically grounded theory and real-world applications, the book is suitable for classroom use and as a reference for system architects.

The book covers the foundation of behavioral modeling using process algebra, transition systems, abstract data types, and modal logics. Exercises and examples augment the theoretical discussion. The book introduces a modeling language, mCRL2, that enables concise descriptions of even the most intricate distributed algorithms and protocols. Using behavioral axioms and such proof methods as confluence, cones, and foci, readers will learn how to prove such algorithms equal to their specifications. Specifications in mCRL2 can be simulated, visualized, or verified against their requirements. An extensive mCRL2 toolset for mechanically verifying the requirements is freely available online; this toolset has been successfully used to design and analyze industrial software that ranges from healthcare applications to particle accelerators at CERN. Appendixes offer material on equations and notation as well as exercise solutions.

Have you ever wondered how your GPS can find the fastest way to your destination, selecting one route from seemingly countless possibilities in mere seconds? How your credit card account number is protected when you make a purchase over the Internet? The answer is algorithms. And how do these mathematical formulations translate themselves into your GPS, your laptop, or your smart phone? This book offers an engagingly written guide to the basics of computer algorithms. In Algorithms Unlocked, Thomas Cormen—coauthor of the leading college textbook on the subject—provides a general explanation, with limited mathematics, of how algorithms enable computers to solve problems.

Readers will learn what computer algorithms are, how to describe them, and how to evaluate them. They will discover simple ways to search for information in a computer; methods for rearranging information in a computer into a prescribed order (“sorting”); how to solve basic problems that can be modeled in a computer with a mathematical structure called a “graph” (useful for modeling road networks, dependencies among tasks, and financial relationships); how to solve problems that ask questions about strings of characters such as DNA structures; the basic principles behind cryptography; fundamentals of data compression; and even that there are some problems that no one has figured out how to solve on a computer in a reasonable amount of time.

Much of the difficulty in creating information technology systems that truly meet people’s needs lies in the problem of pinning down system requirements. This book offers a new approach to the requirements challenge, based on modeling and analyzing the relationships among stakeholders. Although the importance of the system-environment relationship has long been recognized in the requirements engineering field, most requirements modeling techniques express the relationship in mechanistic and behavioral terms. This book describes a modeling approach (called the i* framework) that conceives of software-based information systems as being situated in environments in which social actors relate to each other in terms of goals to be achieved, tasks to be performed, and resources to be furnished. Social perspectives on computing have provided much insight for many years. The i* framework aims to offer a modeling approach to the relationships embedded in computer systems that is part of an engineering method that offers systematic techniques and tools providing smooth linkages to the rest of the system development process, including system design and implementation. The book includes Eric Yu’s original proposal for the i* framework as well as research that applies, adapts, extends, or evaluates the social modeling concepts and approach.

This text is a guide to the foundations of method engineering, a developing field concerned with the definition of techniques for designing software systems. The approach is based on metamodeling, the construction of a model about a collection of other models. The book applies the metamodeling approach in five case studies, each describing a solution to a problem in a specific domain. Suitable for classroom use, the book is also useful as a reference for practitioners. The book first presents the theoretical basis of metamodeling for method engineering, discussing information modeling, the potential of metamodeling for software systems development, and the introduction of the metamodeling tool ConceptBase. The second, and larger, portion of the book reports on applications of the metamodeling approach to method engineering. These detailed case studies range from telecommunication service specification, hypermedia design, and data warehousing to cooperative requirements engineering, chemical device modeling, and design of new abstraction principles of modeling languages. Although these chapters can stand alone as case studies, they also relate to the earlier theoretical chapters. The metamodeling approach described in the book is based on the Telos metamodeling language implemented by the ConceptBase system. An accompanying CD-ROM contains the ConceptBase system and a large collection of Telos metamodels discussed in the text. The CD-ROM enables readers to start directly with method engineering, from small method chunks up to complete method definitions. The complete definition of Ed Yourdon’s structured analysis method is included as an instructional example.

Devices

This text offers an introduction to quantum computing, with a special emphasis on basic quantum physics, experiment, and quantum devices. Unlike many other texts, which tend to emphasize algorithms, Quantum Computing without Magic explains the requisite quantum physics in some depth, and then explains the devices themselves. It is a book for readers who, having already encountered quantum algorithms, may ask, "Yes, I can see how the algebra does the trick, but how can we actually do it?" By explaining the details in the context of the topics covered, this book strips the subject of the "magic" with which it is so often cloaked.

Quantum Computing without Magic covers the essential probability calculus; the qubit, its physics, manipulation and measurement, and how it can be implemented using superconducting electronics; quaternions and density operator formalism; unitary formalism and its application to Berry phase manipulation; the biqubit, the mysteries of entanglement, nonlocality, separability, biqubit classification, and the Schroedinger's Cat paradox; the controlled-NOT gate, its applications and implementations; and classical analogs of quantum devices and quantum processes.

Quantum Computing without Magic can be used as a complementary text for physics and electronic engineering undergraduates studying quantum computing and basic quantum mechanics, or as an introduction and guide for electronic engineers, mathematicians, computer scientists, or scholars in these fields who are interested in quantum computing and how it might fit into their research programs.

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