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Scientific & Engineering Computation

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From a Programming Perspective

This text evolved from a new curriculum in scientific computing that was developed to teach undergraduate science and engineering majors how to use high-performance computing systems (supercomputers) in scientific and engineering applications.

A Users' Guide and Tutorial for Network Parallel Computing

Written by the team that developed the software, this tutorial is the definitive resource for scientists, engineers, and other computer users who want to use PVM to increase the flexibility and power of their high-performance computing resources. PVM introduces distributed computing, discusses where and how to get the PVM software, provides an overview of PVM and a tutorial on setting up and running existing programs, and introduces basic programming techniques including putting PVM in existing code.

A New Approach to Circuit Depth

Communication Complexity describes a new intuitive model for studying circuit networks that captures the essence of circuit depth. Although the complexity of boolean functions has been studied for almost 4 decades, the main problems the inability to show a separation of any two classes, or to obtain nontrivial lower bounds remain unsolved. The communication complexity approach provides clues as to where to took for the heart of complexity and also sheds light on how to get around the difficulty of proving lower bounds.

Proceedings of the Fifth MIT Conference

The field of VLSI (Very Large Scale Integration) is concerned with the design, production, and use of highly complex integrated circuits. The research collected here comes from many disciplines, including computer architecture, computer-aided design, parallel algorithms, semiconductor technology, and testing.

This book on stability theory and robustness will interest researchers and advanced graduate students in the area of feedback control engineering, circuits, and systems. It will also appeal to mathematicians who are involved in applications of functional analysis to engineering problems.

The mathematical operation of quantization exists in many communication and control systems. The increasing demand on existing digital facilities, such as communication channels and data storage, can be alleviated by representing the same amount of information with fewer bits at the expense of more sophisticated data processing. In Estimation and Control with Quantized Measurements, Dr. Curry examines the two distinct but related problems of state variable estimation and control when the measurements are quantized.

Contributions to this edition of Computer Methods have been extensively revised and contain much new material—updating the proceedings of a conference held in 1964 at the Joint Center for Urban Studies of MIT and Harvard University. In this conference, social scientists experienced in computer use compared notes on the problems and benefits encountered in their studies with beginners in computer analysis.

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