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Development Economics

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This second edition of an innovative undergraduate text offers an approach to understanding different economic systems that reflects both recent transformations in the world economy and recent changes in the field of Comparative Economic Systems. The traditional way of teaching comparative economics, with its reliance on relatively simple dichotomies (private vs. state, planning vs. market) does not take into consideration the many variants and mixtures of economic systems that exist in the real world.

Theory and Evidence

In Market Institutions in Sub-Saharan Africa, Marcel Fafchamps synthesizes the results of recent surveys of indigenous market institutions in twelve countries, including Benin, Ghana, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, and Zimbabwe, and presents findings about economics exchange in Africa that have implications both for future research and current policy. Employing empirical data as well as theoretical models that clarify the data, Fafchamps takes as his unifying principle the difficulties of contract enforcement.

Essays in Honor of Joseph E. Stiglitz

Throughout Joseph Stiglitz's long and distinguished career in economics, the focus has been on the real world, with all of its imperfections. His 2001 Nobel Prize recognized his pioneering research in imperfect information; his work in other areas, including macroeconomics, public economics, and development economics, has been just as influential. This volume, a collection of essays written to mark Stiglitz's sixtieth birthday, reflects the wide-ranging influence of "Stiglitzian" economics.

Taiwan's Upgrading Policies

In this book Alice Amsden and Wan-wen Chu cover new ground by analyzing the phenomenon of high-end catch-up. They study how leading firms from the most advanced latecomer countries like Taiwan have increased their market share in mature high-tech industries and services.

British Joint Ventures in India and Pakistan

Trade between developed countries has so accelerated in recent decades that it tends to obscure the less obvious returns but considerable potential of business opportunities in the developing nations. To the businessman thinking of investing in an underdeveloped market the whole issue is fraught with uncertainties, of which the structuring of investment and choice of partners are perhaps the most important and perplexing.

The years between 1940 and 1960 in Chile were marked by economic stagnation. Urban migration, reflecting this economic decay, as well as demographic conditions, are the subject of this study. The work attempts to coordinate the record of Chile's economic development with an account of its concomitant internal migration. In particular, shifts in urban population and changes in the structure of the labor force are explored in an attempt to understand the role of migration.

The Textile and Pulp and Paper Industries

A developing country's choice of an appropriate technology from among those available for use in a particular industry is critical: alternative technological strategies that involve varying mixes of capital, labor, and social costs could have significantly different impacts not only on the industry but also on the country itself, especially one whose industrial base is restricted. This book presents one of the first empirical studies in this area.

The Less Developed Economy Revisited

Virtually all industrialized nations have annual per capita incomes greater than $15,000; meanwhile, over three billion people, more than half the worlds population, live in countries with per capita incomes of less than $700. Development economics studies the economies of such countries and the problems they face, including poverty, chronic underemployment, low wages, rampant inflation, and oppressive international debt.

In this examination of the political economy of economic policy determination and evolution in developing countries, Anne Krueger provides concrete insights into the interaction of economic and political variables that determine the success or failure of such policies an understanding that is essential if economists are to provide realistic technical assistance in the formulation of economic policy reform programs.

The 1994-1995 Mexican crisis was the first in a succession of financial crises to hit emerging markets in Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, South Korea, Russia, Brazil, Argentina, and Turkey. In almost all these cases, problems in the banking sector played a key role. Any analysis of recent developments in emerging market economies must consider two questions: What is the degree of financial vulnerability in emerging market economies, and what, if any, is the connection between the exchange rate regime and financial vulnerability?

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