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Cognitive Neuroscience

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From Neuroscience to Social Science - Volume 1: Mechanisms of Imitation and Imitation in Animals

Imitation is not the low-level, cognitively undemanding behavior it is often assumed to be, but rather—along with language and the ability to understand other minds—one of a trio of related capacities that are fundamental to human mentality. In these landmark volumes, leading researchers across a range of disciplines provide a state-of-the-art view of imitation, integrating the latest findings and theories with reviews of seminal work, and revealing why imitation is a topic of such intense current scientific interest.

From Neuroscience to Social Science - Volume 2: Imitation, Human Development, and Culture

Imitation is not the low-level, cognitively undemanding behavior it is often assumed to be, but rather—along with language and the ability to understand other minds—one of a trio of related capacities that are fundamental to human mentality. In these landmark volumes, leading researchers across a range of disciplines provide a state-of-the-art view of imitation, integrating the latest findings and theories with reviews of seminal work, and revealing why imitation is a topic of such intense current scientific interest.

A Methods Handbook
Edited by Todd C. Handy

The study of event-related potentials (ERPs)—signal-averaged EEG recordings that are time-locked to perceptual, cognitive, and motor events—has increased dramatically in recent years, but until now there has been no comprehensive guide to ERP methodology comparable to those available for fMRI techniques. Event-Related Potentials meets the need for a practical and concise handbook of ERP methods that is suitable for both the novice user of an ERP system and a researcher more experienced in cognitive electrophysiology.

Each edition of this classic reference has proved to be a benchmark in the developing field of cognitive neuroscience. The third edition of The Cognitive Neurosciences continues to chart new directions in the study of the biologic underpinnings of complex cognition—the relationship between the structural and physiological mechanisms of the nervous system and the psychological reality of the mind. Every chapter is new and each section has new participants.

The Science of Neuroeconomics

In this provocative book, Paul Glimcher argues that economic theory may provide an alternative to the classical Cartesian model of the brain and behavior. Glimcher argues that Cartesian dualism operates from the false premise that the reflex is able to describe behavior in the real world that animals inhabit. A mathematically rich cognitive theory, he claims, could solve the most difficult problems that any environment could present, eliminating the need for dualism by eliminating the need for a reflex theory.

A Tutorial Introduction

Independent component analysis (ICA) is becoming an increasingly important tool for analyzing large data sets. In essence, ICA separates an observed set of signal mixtures into a set of statistically independent component signals, or source signals. In so doing, this powerful method can extract the relatively small amount of useful information typically found in large data sets. The applications for ICA range from speech processing, brain imaging, and electrical brain signals to telecommunications and stock predictions.

The authors of Complex Worlds from Simpler Nervous Systems explain how animals with small, often minuscule, nervous systems—jumping spiders, bees, praying mantids, toads, and others—are not the simple "reflex machines" they were once thought to be. Because these animals live in the same world as do much larger species, they must meet the same environmental challenges.

Visual Metacognition in Adults and Children
Edited by Daniel T. Levin

Experimental research has shown that people miss apparently obvious visual discontinuities—a phenomenon known as "change blindness." For example, in one experiment, subjects watching a brief film of a conversation between two actors did not notice that in some shots one actor appeared wearing a large, colorful scarf and in other shots she wore no scarf; in another experiment, subjects did not even notice when one actor was replaced by another between shots.

This landmark reference work brings together for the first time in one volume the most recent research from different areas of the emerging field of multisensory integration. After many years of using a modality-specific "sense-by-sense" approach, researchers across different disciplines in neuroscience and psychology now recognize that perception is fundamentally a multisensory experience.

The cognitive neuroscience of human vision draws on two kinds of evidence: functional imaging of normal subjects and the study of neurological patients with visual disorders. Martha Farah's landmark 1990 book Visual Agnosia presented the first comprehensive analysis of disorders of visual recognition within the framework of cognitive neuroscience, and remains the authoritative work on the subject.

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