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Anil K Kashyap

Anil K Kashyap is Edward Eagle Brown Professor of Economics and Finance and Richard N. Rossett Faculty Fellow at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business. He is the coauthor of Corporate Financing and Governance in Japan: The Road to the Future (MIT Press, 2001).

Titles by This Author

The Road to the Future

In this book Takeo Hoshi and Anil Kashyap examine the history of the Japanese financial system, from its nineteenth-century beginnings through the collapse of the 1990s that concluded with sweeping reforms. Combining financial theory with new data and original case studies, they show why the Japanese financial system developed as it did and how its history affects its ongoing evolution.

The authors describe four major periods within Japan's financial history and speculate on the fifth, into which Japan is now moving. Throughout, they focus on four questions: How do households hold their savings? How is business financing provided? What range of services do banks provide? And what is the nature and extent of bank involvement in the management of firms? The answers provide a framework for analyzing the history of the past 150 years, as well as implications of the just-completed reforms known as the "Japanese Big Bang."

Hoshi and Kashyap show that the largely successful era of bank dominance in postwar Japan is over, largely because deregulation has exposed the banks to competition from capital markets and foreign competitors. The banks are destined to shrink as households change their savings patterns and their customers continue to migrate to new funding sources. Securities markets are set to re-emerge as central to corporate finance and governance.

Titles by This Editor

Japan’s economic bubble burst in the early 1990s, and the country entered its famous “lost decade”--a period of stagnation and economic disruption that persisted until 2003. The current declines in global equity and real estate markets have eerie parallels to Japan’s economic woes of the 1990s. If we are to avoid repeating Japan’s experience on a global scale, we must understand what happened, why it happened, and the effectiveness (or ineffectiveness) of Japan’s policy choices. In this volume, prominent economists--Japan specialists and others--bring state-of-the-art models and analytic tools to bear on these questions. The essays generate new facts and new findings about Japan’s lost decade. As much of the research shows, the slowdown can be broken down into two phases: a typical recession, followed by a breakdown in the economy likely due to insufficient restructuring, which is not well described by conventional models. The contributors offer forceful arguments showing that Japan’s experience, and the unconventional--sometimes unsuccessful--measures adopted by Japan’s government and central bank, offer valuable lessons for our post-boom world.ContributorsKenn Ariga, Robert Barsky, Diego Comin, Robert Dekle, Kyoji Fukao, Koichi Hamada, Takeo Hoshi, Ryo Kambayashi, Anil K Kashyap, Takao Kato, Satoshi Koibuchi, Philip R. Lane, John Muellbauer, Kiko Murata, Maurice Obstfeld, Ryosuke Okazawa, Joe Peek, Ulrike Schaede, David E. Weinstein