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Charles P. Kindleberger

Charles P. Kindleberger is Ford International Professor of Economics Emeritus, MIT and Visiting Professor, Brandeis University.

Titles by This Author

A Retrospective

Charles P. Kindleberger's rich and distinguised career has spanned nearly six decades. The essays collected here reflect the author's shift in interests from foreign exchange to international trade, economic growth, and economic history, especially financial history. They also contain dollops of sociology and political science. Kindleberger views himself as a historical economist who tests economic propositions against the historical record in more than one setting. The collection contains many of the jewels of Kindleberger's work. Most of the papers are strong on comparison (within Western Europe and between Europe and the United States), on economic or financial history, and on social science beyond the confines of economics.

This collection of essays addresses the vital question of how much the theory of direct foreign investment - developed a decade ago before many drastic changes took place on the international economic scene - still holds. Grouped in five major sections, they cover The Theory of Direct Foreign Investment; Industrial Organization and International Markets; Country Studies; International Finance; and Implications for the United States.

Charles P. Kindleberger is widely regarded as among the most accessible and intelligent practitioners of the economist's craft. This collection of his papers and lectures, articles and reviews, prepared over the past decade, focuses on the role of multinational corporations in the international economy, their relationships with home and host countries (both developed and less developed), the determinants of their size, the impetus to their investment behavior, their history, the literature about them, and their regulation.

Chapters relate the phenomenon of the multinational corporation to the body of economic theory. They discuss multinational corporations in world affairs, size of firm and size of nation, the clash of economics and sociology and politics in the internationalization of business, restrictions on direct investment in host countries, direct investment in less developed countries and in militant developing nations, ownership and contract in international business, and multinationals and the small open economy.

The origins of United States direct investment in France, and international banks and international business are taken up, followed by Kindleberger's reviews of major books on the multinational corporation and including his criticisms of such popular writing as Barnet and Moller's Global Reach, and Magdoff's Age of Imperialism.

Kindleberger's policy statements before various national and international governments, in which he proposes the creation of a loose framework among national authorities to harmonize policies toward the multinational corporation are also included.

Titles by This Editor

It is generally known that the United States, a large country, has spawned business corporations that transcend international boundaries—"multinationals." What is not generally known is that many smaller countries are rapidly following suit—they too are opening and expanding international operations for their own local firms. This book is the first organized effort by scholars to deal with non-American international corporations as a general phenomenon.

Initially presented at a colloquium devoted to the subject held at MIT in January 1976, these seven essays bring to light the relatively unpublicized international activities of firms originating in a number of geographically and economically diverse smaller countries.

This collection of essays addresses the vital question of how much the theory of direct foreign investment - developed a decade ago before many drastic changes took place on the international economic scene - still holds. Grouped in five major sections, they cover The Theory of Direct Foreign Investment; Industrial Organization and International Markets; Country Studies; International Finance; and Implications for the United States.