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David Caplan

David Caplan is Associate Professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School, Adjunct Associate Professor in the Departments of Neurology and Communication at Boston University, Associate Neurologist at Massachusetts General Hospital, and Visiting Lecturer in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences at MIT.

Titles by This Author

Structure, Processing, and Disorders

This theoretical guide for speech-language pathologists, neuropsychologists, neurologists, and cognitive psychologists describes the linguistic and psycholinguistic basis of aphasias that are a result of acquired neurological disease. Caplan first outlines contemporary concepts and models in language processing and then shows in detail how these are related to language disorders.

On the basis of a decade's work on syntactic-comprehension disorders, primarily in the Neurolinguistics Laboratory of the Montreal Neurological Hospital, David Caplan and Nancy Hildebrandt present an original theory of these disturbances of language function. They suggest in this wide-ranging study that syntactic structure breaks down after damage to the brain because of specific impairments in the parsing processes and a general decrease in the amount of computational space that can be devoted to that function.

Profoundly influenced by the analyses, of contemporary linguistics, these original contributions bring a number of different views to bear on important issues in a controversial area of study. The linguistic structures and language-related processes the book deals with are for the most part central (syntactic structures, phonological representations, semantic readings) rather than peripheral (acousticphonetic structures and the perception and production of these structures) aspects of language. Each section contains a summarizing introduction.

Titles by This Editor

Edited by David Caplan

These fifteen contributions by well-known linguists, psychologists, and neuroscientists explore the new concepts and themes that extend and revise previously held ideas about the biology of cognition.