Skip navigation

MIT Press

Titles by This Author

In seeking to explain his opinions on a timeless subject ;the relations between the sexes ;John Stuart Mill admits that he has undertaken an arduous task.

A collection of lectures from a special summer program at MIT's Operations Research Center treats topics in operations research for industry, military services, and governmental departments, beginning with the principles and application of probability theory.From the Introduction:"An operation is a pattern of activity of men and machines, engaged in carrying out a cooperative and usually repetitive task, with pre-set goals and according to specified rules of operation. The scientific study of operarations is called operations research. . . .

A text book designed to give the engineer a reasonably complete coverage of the mathematical topics needed specifically or collaterally in the analysis or synthesis of electrical networks.

MIT in World War II

The story of MIT's contribution to the war effort, 1939-1945, including the role of MIT scientists in research and development at the national level as well as the activities on the campus.

A Study of New England Industrial Community, 1937–1939 and 1942

A detailed statistical case study of job changing in a New England city with diversified industries, citing the economic, geographical, social, and psychological factors conducive to worker stability and to worker mobility.

Titles by This Editor

Edited by MIT Press

This collection of papers is the result of a desire to make available reprints of articles on digital signal processing for use in a graduate course offered at MIT. The primary objective was to present reprints in an easily accessible form. At the same time, it appeared that this collection might be useful for a wider audience, and consequently it was decided to reproduce the articles (originally published between 1965 and 1969) in book form.The literature in this area is extensive, as evidenced by the bibliography included at the end of this collection.

Its Contents, Methods, and Meaning
Edited by MIT Press

Mathematics, which originated in antiquity in the needs of daily life, has developed into an immense system of widely varied disciplines. Like the other sciences, it reflects the laws of the material world around us and serves as a powerful instrument for our knowledge and mastery of nature. But the high level of abstraction peculiar to mathematics means that its newer branches are relatively inaccessible to nonspecialists.