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Stephen M. Kosslyn

Titles by This Author

The Resolution of the Imagery Debate


This long-awaited work by prominent Harvard psychologist Stephen Kosslyn integrates a twenty-year research program on the nature of high-level vision and mental imagery. Image and Brain marshals insights and empirical results from computer vision, neuroscience, and cognitive science to develop a general theory of visual mental imagery, its relation to visual perception, and its implementation in the human brain. It offers a definitive resolution to the long-standing debate about the nature of the internal representation of visual mental imagery.

Kosslyn reviews evidence that perception and representation are inextricably linked, and goes on to show how "quasi-pictorial" events in the brain are generated, interpreted, and used in cognition. The theory is tested with brain- scanning techniques that provide stronger evidence than has been possible in the past.

Known for his work in high-level vision, one of the most empirically successful areas of experimental psychology, Kosslyn uses a highly interdisciplinary approach. He reviews and integrates an extensive amount of literature in a coherent presentation, and reports a wide range of new findings using a host of techniques.

A Bradford Book


Titles by This Editor

Cognitive neuroscience has undergone explosive growth in the past ten years. New brain-imaging technologies have allowed researchers to address questions that until recently remained in the realm of mere speculation. Moreover, better computers and new theories have led to more detailed models of neural function. These developments have made it possible to link perception, attention, memory, and other aspects of cognition to neurobiology.

Because researchers come to cognitive neuroscience from a variety of fields, researchers and students alike find it difficult to ascertain the core literature. This volume, which contains forty-six review articles from recent issues of Current Opinion in Neurobiology, provides easy access to the current state of theory and findings in the field. The book is organized into five sections: Perception and Attention, Neuronal Plasticity and Memory, Cognition, The Organization of Action, and Development and Structure. The articles contain bibliographies to enable the reader to pursue individual topics in greater depth.

Visual Cognition

An Invitation to Cognitive Science provides a point of entry into the vast realm of cognitive science, offering selected examples of issues and theories from many of its subfields. All of the volumes in the second edition contain substantially revised and as well as entirely new chapters.Rather than surveying theories and data in the manner characteristic of many introductory textbooks in the field, An Invitation to Cognitive Science employs a unique case study approach, presenting a focused research topic in some depth and relying on suggested readings to convey the breadth of views and results. Each chapter tells a coherent scientific story, whether developing themes and ideas or describing a particular model and exploring its implications.The volumes are self contained and can be used individually in upper-level undergraduate and graduate courses ranging from introductory psychology, linguistics, cognitive science, and decision sciences, to social psychology, philosophy of mind, rationality, language, and vision science.

Frontiers in Cognitive Neuroscience is the first book of extensive readings in an exciting new field that is built on the assumption that "the mind is what the brain does," and that seeks to understand how brain function gives rise to mental activities such as perception, memory, and language. The editors, a cognitive scientist and a neuroscientist, have worked together to select contributions that provide the interdisciplinary foundations of this emerging field, putting them into context, both historically and with regard to current issues.Fifty-five articles are grouped in sections that cover attention, vision, auditory and somatosensory systems, memory, and higher cortical functions. They range from Gazzaniga and Bogen's discussion of functional effects of sectioning the cerebral commissure in man and Geschwind's classic study of the organization of language in the brain, published in the 1960s, to contemporary investigations by Schiller and Logothetis on color-opponent and broad-band channels of the primate visual system and by Bekkers and Stevens on presynaptic mechanisms for long-term potentiation in the hippocampus. The editors have provided both a general introduction and introductions to each of the five major sections.Stephen Kosslyn is Professor of Psychology at Harvard University. Richard Andersen is Professor of Neuroscience and Director of the McDonnell-Pew Center for Cognitive Neuroscience at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.