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Stewart W. Wilson

Stewart W. Wilson is a scientist at The Rowland Institute for Science, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Titles by This Editor

Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Simulation of Adaptive Behavior

The Animals to Animats Conference brings together researchers from ethology, psychology, ecology, artificial intelligence, artificial life, robotics, engineering, and related fields to further understanding of the behaviors and underlying mechanisms that allow natural and synthetic agents (animats) to adapt and survive in uncertain environments. The work presented focuses on well-defined models—robotic, computer-simulation, and mathematical—that help to characterize and compare various organizational principles or architectures underlying adaptive behavior in both natural animals and animats.

Proceedings of the Fifth International Conference on Simulation of Adaptive Behavior

The Animals to Animats Conference brings together researchers from ethology, psychology, ecology, artificial intelligence, artificial life, robotics, engineering, and related fields to further understanding of the behaviors and underlying mechanisms that allow natural and synthetic agents (animats) to adapt and survive in uncertain environments. The work presented focuses on well-defined models--robotic, computer-simulation, and mathematical--that help to characterize and compare various organizational principles or architectures underlying adaptive behavior in both natural animals and animats.

Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Simulation of Adaptive Behavior
Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Simulation of Adpative Behavior

August 8-12, 1994, Brighton, England

From Animals to Animats 3 brings together research intended to advance the frontier of an exciting new approach to understanding intelligence. The contributors represent a broad range of interests from artificial intelligence and robotics to ethology and the neurosciences. Unifying these approaches is the notion of "animat" - an artificial animal, either simulated by a computer or embodied in a robot, which must survive and adapt in progressively more challenging environments. The 58 contributions focus particularly on well-defined models, computer simulations, and built robots in order to help characterize and compare various principles and architectures capable of inducing adaptive behavior in real or artificial animals.

Topics include:

- Individual and collective behavior.
- Neural correlates of behavior.
- Perception and motor control.
- Motivation and emotion.
- Action selection and behavioral sequences.
- Ontogeny, learning, and evolution.
- Internal world models and cognitive processes.
- Applied adaptive behavior.
- Autonomous robots.
- Heirarchical and parallel organizations.
- Emergent structures and behaviors.
- Problem solving and planning.
- Goal-directed behavior.
- Neural networks and evolutionary computation.
- Characterization of environments.

A Bradford Book

Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Simulation of Adaptive Behavior

More than sixty contributions in From Animals to Animats2 by researchers in ethology, ecology, cybernetics, artificial intelligence, robotics, and related fields investigate behaviors and the underlying mechanisms that allow animals and, potentially, robots to adapt and survive in uncertain environments. Jean-Arcady Meyer is Director of Research, CNRS, Paris. Herbert L. Roitblat is Professor of Psychology at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Stewart W. Wilson is a scientist at The Rowland Institute for Science, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Topics covered: The Animat Approach to Adaptive Behavior. Perception and Motor Control. Action Selection and Behavioral Sequences. Cognitive Maps and Internal World Models. Learning. Evolution. Collective Behavior.

Proceedings of the First International Conference on Simulation of Adaptive Behavior

These sixty contributions from researchers in ethology, ecology, cybernetics, artificial intelligence, robotics, and related fields delve into the behaviors and underlying mechanisms that allow animals and, potentially, robots to adapt and survive in uncertain environments. They focus in particular on simulation models in order to help characterize and compare various organizational principles or architectures capable of inducing adaptive behavior in real or artificial animals.