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Ursula Bellugi

Ursula Bellugi is Professor and Director of the Laboratory for Cognitive Neurosciences at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies. She is the coauthor of What the Hands Reveal about the Brain (MIT Press, 1990).

Titles by This Author

What the Hands Reveal About the Brain provides dramatic evidence that language is not limited to hearing and speech, that there are primary linguistic systems passed down from one generation of deaf people to the next, which have been forged into antonomous languages and are not derived front spoken languages.

All three authors are associated with the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in San Diego. Howard Poizner is Staff Scientist at the Institute's Laboratory for Language and Cognitive Studies. Edward S. Klima is Professor of Linguistics at the University of California, San Diego, and Adjunct Professor at the Salk Institute. Ursula Bellugi is Professor at the Salk Institute and Director of the Institute's Laboratory for Language and Cognitive Studies. Klima and Bellugi are the authors of The Signs of Language.

Titles by This Editor

Perspectives from Williams Syndrome

A blueprint for the investigation of neurodevelopmental disorders, this book presents the work of a team of scientists using a multidisciplinary, integrated approach to link genes with human behavior. Using Williams syndrome as a model, leading researchers in neuroanatomy, neurocognition, neurophysiology, and molecular genetics have built bridges between disciplines to link higher cognitive functions, their underlying neurobiological bases, and their molecular genetic underpinnings. One of the book's many strengths is that the scientists from each discipline studied the same individuals with Williams syndrome. As the book shows, Williams syndrome is a fascinating disorder because of the "peaks and valleys" among cognitive domains: severe intellectual deficits but remarkably spared and effusive language; specific impairment in spatial construction but great strength in face processing and sociability. By capitalizing on these dissociations in higher cognitive functioning, the book provides a model for the study of brain-behavior relationships as well as for the mapping of brain and behavior phenotypes to the genome and beyond.

Contributors:
Ralph Adolphs, Twyla Alvarez, Lawrence Appelbaum, Ursula Bellugi, Dennis Burian, Xiao-Ning Chen, Michael Chiles, Stephan Eliez, Albert Galaburda, Hanao Hirota, Wendy Jones, Julie Korenberg, Zona Lai, Liz Lichtenberger, Alan Lincoln, Rumiko Matsuoka, Debra Mills, Helen Neville, Judy Reilly, Allan Reiss, Bruce Roe, Marie St. George, J. Eric Schmidtt, Erica Straus.