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The PROSE Award Winners

The PROSE Awards were announced live on Thursday, February 2nd, and we're very pleased to announce that many of our books were category winners or received honorable mentions.


The PROSE Awards, established in 1976, are sponsored by the Professional & Scholarly Publishing division (PSP) of the Association of American Publishers. These awards annually recognize the very best in professional and scholarly publishing by bringing attention to distinguished books, journals, and electronic content in 53 categories. The books were Judged by peer publishers, librarians, and medical professionals. Below is the full list of winners: 

 

Winners

The Distracted Mind by Adam Gazzaley and Larry Rosen, Biomedicine and Neuroscience

The Disruption Dilemma by Joshua Gans, Business, Finance & Management

Fighting King Coal by Shannon Elizabeth Bell, Sociology & Social Work

The Rationality Quotient by Keith Stanovich, Richard West, and Maggie Toplak, Education Theory

 

Honorable Mentions

Impossible Languages by Andrea Moro, Language & Linguistics

The End of Ownership by Aaron Perzanowski and Jason Schultz, Law & Legal Studies

The Apparently Marginal Activities of Marcel Duchamp by Elena Filipovic, Art History & Criticism

The Ancient Origins of Consciousness by Todd Feinberg and Jon Mallatt, Biological Science

Open MIND by Thomas Metzinger and Jennifer Windt, Multivolume Reference/Humanities & Social Sciences

Ebola’s Message by Nicholas Evans, Tara Smith, and Maimuna Majumder, Nursing and Allied Health

How Not to Network a Nation by Benjamin Peters, History of Science, Medicine and Technology

 

Congratulations to all!

  • Posted at 03:20 pm on Mon, 06 Feb 2017 in award

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Books, news, and ideas from MIT Press

The MIT PressLog is the official blog of MIT Press. Founded in 2005, the Log chronicles news about MIT Press authors and books. The MIT PressLog also serves as forum for our authors to discuss issues related to their books and scholarship. Views expressed by guest contributors to the blog do not necessarily represent those of MIT Press.