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University Press Week: Selling the Facts

Welcome to University Press Week! This year's focus is #LookItUP: a tribute to the knowledge and facts that all university presses publish and value, especially in the face of "fake news" and "alternative facts". This week we'll be sharing how our friends across the nation are demonstrating their expertise on a variety of subjects. Today's theme is "Selling the Facts". 

Author John Hartigan responds to climate change denial and alternative facts on the University of Minnesota Press's blog. 

University of Texas Press interviewed local booksellers on their experiences serving readers since the election. 

University of Hawai'i Press shared a round-up of interesting and peer-reviewed facts published by UH Press Journals in the past year. 

The Ivy Bookshop also wrote about selling in the age of Trump for Johns Hopkins University Press.

Duke University Press Sales Manager Jennifer Schaper reported on how Frankfurt Book Fair attendees were engaging with Trump and Brexit this year.

Conor Broughan, Northeast Sales Representative for the Columbia University Press Sales Consortium, discusses the roles of University Presses and their sales representatives in politically complicated times.

University Press of Kentucky discussed societal benefits in university presses continuing to publish, and readers continuing to have access to well-researched content in an age of distraction, manufactured outrage, and hyper partisanship.

University of Toronto Press shared the experiences of a Canadian higher education sales rep selling books on US campuses.

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Books, news, and ideas from MIT Press

The MIT PressLog is the official blog of MIT Press. Founded in 2005, the Log chronicles news about MIT Press authors and books. The MIT PressLog also serves as forum for our authors to discuss issues related to their books and scholarship. Views expressed by guest contributors to the blog do not necessarily represent those of MIT Press.