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Paperback | $27.00 Short | £18.95 | ISBN: 9780262521284 | 205 pp. | 6.3 x 9.1 in | July 1987
 

"“University Presses in Space” showcases a special sampling of the many works that university presses have published about space and space exploration."

Architects and Firms

A Sociological Perspective on Architectural Practices

Overview

Architecture is an art, a profession, a business. Architectural firms exist to design buildings, to serve social needs, to make profits. And many architects find that the goals of the firms that employ them run counter to the values that first attracted them to the profession. Sociologists of the professions have looked at law and medicine, but Blau is the first to make architecture the subject of an in-depth case study. This book vividly depicts the contradictions and dilemmas inherent in architectural practice, and corrects many assumptions about design professionals.

While there are no easy recipes, Blau is able to identify the core ingredients of success and failure that correspond to the actual experiences of 152 Manhattan architectural firms over a five-year period. More than 400 architects were surveyed, their convictions and attitudes were assessed, and their values measured against management agendas and priorities. Whether architects agree with her conclusions or not (and there are many surprises in the book), they are strongly supported by data. Since the survey period spanned a severe economic recession, during which mere survival was an issue for many firms, the book's analysis of why some firms flounder while others flourish under the same conditions is particularly valuable.

In the section called "Heroes and Rascals," Blau reveals how respondents ranked 50 wellknown architects, critics, and firms according to various standards, thereby revealing a lot about how professionals view themselves and the range of design approaches, mentors, and models available to them. The study exposes a great disparity between the attitudes of rank-and-file architects and firm heads; the clear inference is that younger architects place a much higher value on the humanistic and creative dimensions of architecture, which could be a major reason for the now chronic crisis the profession finds itself in.

Reviews

"A veritable landmark—the first documented research providing valid and reliable data about the culture of contemporary architectural practice, about why firms succeed or fail, and about the influence of broader social and economic conditions on practice. It is valuable reading for any architect, architectural student, educator, and scholar.", Dana Cuff, Journal of Architectural & Planning Research

"A veritable landmark—the first documented research providing valid and reliable data about the culture of contemporary architectural practice, about why firms succeed or fail, and about the influence of broader social and economic conditions on practice. It is valuable reading for any architect, architectural student, educator, and scholar." Dana Cuff Journal of Architectural & Planning Research

Endorsements

"Judith Blau's application of organizational theories and perspectives on architecture is a pioneering effort, full of intriguing findings. The breadth of her work is impressive as well, for her analyses range, for example, from the economic effects of firm size to the organizational aspects of design philosophy. I recommend Architects and Firms to sociologists of organization, of building, of art and of the professions, but especially to architects, for it offers them an entirely new slant on their work."
Herbert J. Gans, Columbia University