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The Year of the Animal in France

The poet Jean de La Fontaine famously dedicated his Fables in 1668 to Louis XIV's son, declaring in verse that "animals I choose/to proffer lessons that we all might use." Less well known is that La Fontaine's Fables appeared within a peak moment of cultural production about animals, the work of a small, but privileged coterie of writers, artists, philosophers, physicians, and scientists.

The Moon Goddess and the Cave Oracle

Waxing and waning and reborn with each new month, the Moon has always been the supreme symbol of cyclical change in the western world.

Metaphorical representations of the Moon’s goddess also seem to undergo similar changes, each new century reinventing her in its own image. For Hesiod, she was a distant figure in the celestial pantheon, to Keats she was an intimate muse; Selene’s recurring role in music, literature, and song is a powerful testament to our continued fascination with her myth.

More than 15 million American adults grapple with depression in a given year. Anxiety disorders affect 40 million Americans over the age of 18. And yet these diseases are often invisible, hidden, unacknowledged. In Portraits of Resilience, people coping with depression, anxiety, and other challenges step out of the shadows to meet us face to face. A series of photographic portaits conveys their charisma, strength, and wisdom. In accompanying narratives, they describe their struggles and their insights into their conditions and the societal and cultural forces that shaped them.

Theories, Histories, Genres

Literary authors have frequently called on elements of cartography to ground fictional space, to visualize sites, and to help readers get their bearings in the imaginative world of the text. Today, the convergence of digital mapping and globalization has spurred a cartographic turn in literature. This book gathers leading scholars to consider the relationship of literature and cartography. Generously illustrated with full-color maps and visualizations, it offers the first systematic overview of an emerging approach to the study of literature.

Reflections on Life, Landscape, and Song

A legendary singer, folklorist, and music historian, Shirley Collins has been an integral part of the folk-music revival for more than sixty years. In her new memoir, All in the Downs, Collins tells the story of that lifelong relationship with English folksong—a dedication to artistic integrity that has guided her through the triumphs and tragedies of her life.
 

Conversations, Projects and Legacies

This volume from Goldsmiths Press examines the career of the cultural studies pioneer Stuart Hall, investigating his influence and revealing lesser-known facets of his work. These essays evaluate the legacies of his particular brand of cultural studies and demonstrate how other scholars and activists have utilized his thinking in their own research.

Strange Tales and Decadent Poems by Count Eric Stanislaus Stenbock

Described by W. B. Yeats as a “scholar, connoisseur, drunkard, poet, pervert, most charming of men,” Count Stanislaus Eric Stenbock (1860–1895) is surely the greatest exemplar of the Decadent movement of the late nineteenth century.

A friend of Aubrey Beardsley, patron of the extraordinary pre-Raphaelite artist Simeon Solomon, and contemporary of Oscar Wilde, Stenbock died at the age of thirty-six as a result of his addiction to opium and his alcoholism, having published just three slim volumes of suicidal poetry and one collection of morbid short stories.

Written in the early years of the twenty-first century, when the author was engaged in dream-explorations and mystical practices centered on the Greek Moon goddess Selene, Somnium is an intensely personal fictional tapestry that weaves together numerous historical and stylistic variations on the enduring myth of Selene and Endymion. Ranging through the sixteenth to twenty-first centuries, it combines medieval, Elizabethan, Gothic, and Decadent elements in a fantastic romance of rare imagination.