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Hardcover | $50.00 Short | £34.95 | ISBN: 9780262015561 | 512 pp. | 6 x 9 in | June 2011
 

Dialogues with Davidson

Acting, Interpreting, Understanding
Edited by Jeff Malpas

Overview

The work of the philosopher Donald Davidson (1917–2003) is wide ranging not only in its influence and vision, but also in the breadth of issues that it encompasses. Davidson's work includes seminal contributions to philosophy of language and mind, to philosophy of action, and to epistemology and metaphysics.

In Dialogues with Davidson, leading scholars engage with Davidson’s work as it connects not only with aspects of current analytic thinking but also with a wider set of perspectives, including those of hermeneutics, phenomenology, the history of philosophy, feminist epistemology, and contemporary social theory. They link Davidson's work to other thinkers, including Collingwood, Kant, Derrida, Heidegger, and Gadamer.

The essays demonstrate the continuing significance of Davidson's philosophy, not only in terms of the philosophical relevance of the ideas he advanced, but also in the further connections and insights those ideas engender.

About the Editor

Jeff Malpas is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Tasmania. He is the author of Heidegger’s Topology: Being, Place, World (MIT Press, 2007).

Reviews

“It is possible for [the reader] to appreciate the great overall quality of the papers collected in this volume. The attempt to bring traditions that have often ignored each other deserves praise in and of itself. Such a balance between deep analysis and accessibility is rarely obtained, and it is one of the great merits of this volume.” — Pierre-Yves Modicom, LINGUIST

Endorsements

"There is a philosophical vision at work in Davidson's thinking that exceeds in importance and attraction his masterly analyses of meaning and action even while it matches them in subtlety. This volume brings that vision to the fore, engaging with it, as well as with other aspects of the Davidsonian position, in a way that demonstrates its intrinsic significance as well as its connection with the mainstream of contemporary thought."
Dieter Henrich, Professor Emeritus of Philosophy, University of Munich