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Paperback | $40.00 Short | £27.95 | ISBN: 9780262561648 | 275 pp. | March 2003
 

Essential Info

Empirical Methods for International Trade

Overview

A wide range of empirical studies is applied to various countries in this important collection. Bringing together the most recent work in econometrics applied to international trade, main sections of the book cover: cross-country analysis, which can be used to test assumptions or implications of trade models; industry studies, which are receiving renewed interest in recent literature on market structure and trade; and dual methods, which extend the estimation of production and cost functions to incorporate trade flows.

Following the editor's introduction, relating the theory of international trade to empirical applications, are contributions by Richard A. Brecher and Ehsan U. Choudhri, The Factor Content of Consumption in Canada and the United States: A Two-Country Test of the Heckscher-Ohlin-Vanek Model. David Dollar, Edward N. Wolff, and William J. Baumol, The Factor-Price Equalization Model and Industry Labor Productivity: An Empirical Test Across Countries. Edward E. Learner, Cross Section Estimation of the Effects of Trade Barriers. Linda C. Hunter and James R. Markusen, Per-Capita Income as Determinant of Trade. Robert C. Feenstra, Gains from Trade in Differentiated Products: Japanese Compact Trucks. Avinash Dixit, Optimal Trade and Industrial Policies for the U.S. Autombile Industry. Richard E. Baldwin and Paul R. Krugman, Market Access and International Competition: A Simulation Study of 16K Random Access Memories. W. Erwin Diewert and Catherine J. Morrison, Export Supply and Import Demand Functions: A Production Theory Approach. Karyiu Wong, International Factor Mobility and the Volume of Trade: An Empirical Study. Bee Yan Aw and Mark J. Roberts, Price and Quality Level Comparison for U.S. Footware Imports: An Application of Multilateral Index Numbers. Alexandra Cas, W. Erwin Diewert, and Lawrence A. Ostensoe, Productivity Growth and Changes in the Terms of Trade in Canada.

About the Editor

Robert C. Feenstra is Professor of Economics and C. Bryan Cameron Distinguished Chair in International Economics at the University of California, Davis. He directs the International Trade and Investment Program at the NBER and is the author of Advanced International Trade: Theory and Evidence and Offshoring in the Global Economy: Microeconomic Structure and Macroeconomic Implications (MIT Press, 2010).