Macroeconomics after Keynes
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Macroeconomics after Keynes

A Reconsideration of the General Theory

By Victoria Chick

Overview

Author(s)

Praise

Summary

This reassessment of J. M. Keynes's The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money results from the author's experience in using Keynes's book as the core of her macroeconomics courses for undergraduates. It is intended to encourage others to bring the General Theory back into mainstream teaching, because it "gives a far richer understanding of the structure of macroeconomic interactions and methods of analysing them than much of what has been written since."

Hardcover

Out of Print ISBN: 9780262030953 384 pp. | 8.9 in x 6 in

Paperback

$42.00 X | £33.00 ISBN: 9780262530453 384 pp. | 8.9 in x 6 in

Endorsements

  • An authoritative study not only of Keynes's contributions in The General Theory and The Treatise but also of the relevance of these contributions to modern problems. This is an ideal teaching book. It is written with a quiet authority which gives the reader the confidence to feel that this is the authentic interpretation.

    Geoffrey Harcourt

    University of Adelaide

  • Ms. Chick succeeds in clearing up yet a few more errors in the conventional interpretation of Keynes, some of them quite fundamental and basically simple. Her discussion of finance in Keynes is particularly enlightening. Essentially her overriding principle is that the Keynesian system should be interpreted in the context for which it was written, and must not be throughtlessly adapted to quite different economic regimes.

    Basil Moore

    Wesleyan University

  • An authoritative study not only of Keynes's contributions in The General Theory and The Treatise but also of the relevance of these contributions to modern problems. This is an ideal teaching book. It is written with a quiet authority which gives the reader the confidence to feel that this is the authentic interpretation.

    Geoffrey Harcourt

    University of Adelaide

  • Ms. Chick succeeds in clearing up yet a few more errors in the conventional interpretation of Keynes, some of them quite fundamental and basically simple. Her discussion of finance in Keynes is particularly enlightening. Essentially her overriding principle is that the Keynesian system should be interpreted in the context for which it was written, and must not be throughtlessly adapted to quite different economic regimes.

    Basil Moore

    Wesleyan University