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Hardcover | $80.00 Short | £59.95 | ISBN: 9780262021821 | 603 pp. | 6.5 x 9.25 in | March 1983
 

"“University Presses in Space” showcases a special sampling of the many works that university presses have published about space and space exploration."

Robot Motion

Planning and Control

Overview

The present surge of interest in robotics can be expected to continue through the 1980s. Major research efforts are springing up throughout industry and in the universities. Senior and graduate level courses are being developed or planned in many places to prepare students to contribute to the development of the field and its industrial applications. Robot Motion will serve this emerging audience as a single source of information on current research in the field.

The book brings together nineteen papers of fundamental importance to the development of a science of robotics. These are grouped in five sections: Dynamics; Trajectory Planning; Compliance and Force Control; Feedback Control; and Spatial Planning. Each section is introduced by a substantial analytical survey that lays out the problems that arise in that area of robotics and the approaches and solutions that have been tried, with an evaluation of their strengths and shortcomings. In addition, there is an overall introduction that relates robotics research to general trends in the development of artificial intelligence.

Individual papers are the work of H. Hanafusa, H. Asada, N. Hogan, M. T. Mason, R. Paul, B. Shimano, M. H. Raibert, J. J. Craig, R. H. Taylor, D. E. Whitney, J. M. Hollerbach, J. Luh, M. Walker, R. J. Popplestone, A. P. Ambler, I. M. Bellos, T. LozanoPerez, E. Freund, D. F. Golla, S. C. Garg, P. C. Hughes, and K. D. Young.

Robot Motion is included in the MIT Press Artificial Intelligence Series.

About the Editors

Michael Brady is Senior Research Scientist at MIT's Artifical Intelligence Laboratory.

John Hollerbach is an Associate Professor in the MIT Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences and the MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory.

Matthew T. Mason is Professor of Computer Science and Robotics at Carnegie Mellon University.