Skip navigation
Hardcover | $13.75 Short | £10.50 | ISBN: 9780262025737 | 328 pp. | 6 x 9 in | 2 illus.| November 2004
Paperback | $27.00 X | £19.95 | ISBN: 9780262524292 | 328 pp. | 6 x 9 in | 2 illus.| November 2004

Instructor Resources

Scarcity, Conflicts, and Cooperation

Essays in the Political and Institutional Economics of Development

About the Author

Pranab Bardhan is Professor of Economics at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the author of Scarcity, Conflicts, and Cooperation (MIT Press, 2004) and coeditor (with Christopher Udry) of Readings in Development Microeconomics, Volumes I and II (MIT Press, 2000).

Endorsements

“If world poverty were simply an economic problem, we would be closer to a solution by now. But underdevelopment is a web of economic, political, institutional, ethnic, and class-related connections with persistent historical roots. In this simultaneously broad and sharp book, Pranab Bardhan tries to bring some analytical order into this important arena, and anyone who wants to understand the problem and the possibilities of policy will profit from reading it.”
Robert M. Solow, Institute Professor of Economics, Emeritus, MIT, and Nobel Laureate in Economics (1987)
“The essyas in this book cover topics of first-orde importance for understanding the development process. While rooted in economics, Pranab Bardhan offers an approach that combines a breadth of vision with an eye for relevance. Engaging with the ideas in the book is essential for anyone who is concerned with problems of governance and institutional change.”
Timothy Besley, Professor of Economics and Political Science, London School of Economics and Political Science
“This is an important contribution to the institutional economics of development by a leading scholar. It will be required reading not only for economists but for anthropologists, sociologists and political scientists working on social economic development.”
Yujiro Hayami, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies, Tokyo
“William Easterly knows his way not only around economics but also around the developing world. He has written a hard-nosed book about the hardest problem of all: how to get the poorest countries on a path of sustained growth.”
Robert M. Solow, Institute Professor of Economics, Emeritus, MIT, and Nobel Laureate in Economics (1987)
“I remember a cartoon in which a personnel manager says to a prospective employee: 'We offer no security. But then we expect no loyalty.' The authors think that this is more sad than funny. They ask important questions about how the labor market could make room for both security and loyalty for today's mobile workers and fast-changing firms. And they offer innovative answers.”
Robert M. Solow, Institute Professor of Economics, Emeritus, MIT, and Nobel Laureate in Economics (1987)