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Hardcover | Out of Print | ISBN: 9780262011624 | 336 pp. | 6 x 9 in | September 1997
Paperback | $6.75 Short | £5.95 | ISBN: 9780262511018 | 336 pp. | 6 x 9 in | July 1998

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Technology and Privacy

The New Landscape


Privacy is the capacity to negotiate social relationships by controlling access to personal information. As laws, policies, and technological design increasingly structure people's relationships with social institutions, individual privacy faces new threats and new opportunities.

Over the last several years, the realm of technology and privacy has been transformed, creating a landscape that is both dangerous and encouraging. Significant changes include large increases in communications bandwidths; the widespread adoption of computer networking and public-key cryptography; mathematical innovations that promise a vast family of protocols for protecting identity in complex transactions; new digital media that support a wide range of social relationships; a new generation of technologically sophisticated privacy activists; a massive body of practical experience in the development and application of data-protection laws; and the rapid globalization of manufacturing, culture, and policy making.

The essays in this book provide a new conceptual framework for the analysis and debate of privacy policy and for the design and development of information systems. The authors are international experts in the technical, economic, and political aspects of privacy; the book's strength is its synthesis of the three. The book provides equally strong analyses of privacy issues in the United States, Canada, and Europe.

Contributors: Philip E. Agre, Victoria Bellotti, Colin J. Bennett, Herbert Burkert, Simon G. Davies, David H. Flaherty, Robert Gellman, Viktor Mayer-Schönberger, David J. Phillips, Rohan Samarajiva.


“A remarkably comprehensive and provocative collection of essays.”
Peter G. Neumann, WIRED

“With much food for thought, this book is a real bargain for anyone looking for a snapshot of current thinking on privacy and computing.”
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