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This book presents a variety of computational methods used to solve dynamic problems in economics and finance. It emphasizes practical numerical methods rather than mathematical proofs and focuses on techniques that apply directly to economic analyses. The examples are drawn from a wide range of subspecialties of economics and finance, with particular emphasis on problems in agricultural and resource economics, macroeconomics, and finance. The book also provides an extensive Web-site library of computer utilities and demonstration programs.The book is divided into two parts. The first part develops basic numerical methods, including linear and nonlinear equation methods, complementarity methods, finite-dimensional optimization, numerical integration and differentiation, and function approximation. The second part presents methods for solving dynamic stochastic models in economics and finance, including dynamic programming, rational expectations, and arbitrage pricing models in discrete and continuous time. The book uses MATLAB to illustrate the algorithms and includes a utilities toolbox to help readers develop their own computational economics applications.

Introduction to the Economics and Mathematics of Financial Markets fills the longstanding need for an accessible yet serious textbook treatment of financial economics. The book provides a rigorous overview of the subject, while its flexible presentation makes it suitable for use with different levels of undergraduate and graduate students. Each chapter presents mathematical models of financial problems at three different degrees of sophistication: single-period, multi-period, and continuous-time. The single-period and multi-period models require only basic calculus and an introductory probability/statistics course, while an advanced undergraduate course in probability is helpful in understanding the continuous-time models. In this way, the material is given complete coverage at different levels; the less advanced student can stop before the more sophisticated mathematics and still be able to grasp the general principles of financial economics.The book is divided into three parts. The first part provides an introduction to basic securities and financial market organization, the concept of interest rates, the main mathematical models, and quantitative ways to measure risks and rewards. The second part treats option pricing and hedging; here and throughout the book, the authors emphasize the Martingale or probabilistic approach. Finally, the third part examines equilibrium models -- a subject often neglected by other texts in financial mathematics, but included here because of the qualitative insight it offers into the behavior of market participants and pricing.

Downloadable instructor resources available for this title: instructor’s manual

The Road to the Future

In this book Takeo Hoshi and Anil Kashyap examine the history of the Japanese financial system, from its nineteenth-century beginnings through the collapse of the 1990s that concluded with sweeping reforms. Combining financial theory with new data and original case studies, they show why the Japanese financial system developed as it did and how its history affects its ongoing evolution.

The authors describe four major periods within Japan's financial history and speculate on the fifth, into which Japan is now moving. Throughout, they focus on four questions: How do households hold their savings? How is business financing provided? What range of services do banks provide? And what is the nature and extent of bank involvement in the management of firms? The answers provide a framework for analyzing the history of the past 150 years, as well as implications of the just-completed reforms known as the "Japanese Big Bang."

Hoshi and Kashyap show that the largely successful era of bank dominance in postwar Japan is over, largely because deregulation has exposed the banks to competition from capital markets and foreign competitors. The banks are destined to shrink as households change their savings patterns and their customers continue to migrate to new funding sources. Securities markets are set to re-emerge as central to corporate finance and governance.

Protecting Investors in the Long Run

This text makes accessible the most important methodological advances in bond evaluation from the past twenty years. With uncommon precision and a strong emphasis on the underlying economic fundamentals, Olivier de La Grandville presents a unified framework for understanding the basic tools of bond evaluation, including duration, convexity, and immunization.Among the book's most valuable contributions is a general immunization theorem that can be used by practitioners to protect investors against any change in the structure of spot interest rates. Also of note is the detailed presentation of the Heath-Jarrow-Morton model and a discussion of its relationships with classical immunization schemes. Each chapter is followed by a series of questions, problem sets, and projects; detailed solutions to all of them appear at the end of the book. Although the treatment is thorough and rigorous, the presentation throughout the book is intuitive.

To harness the full power of computer technology, economists need to use a broad range of mathematical techniques. In this book, Kenneth Judd presents techniques from the numerical analysis and applied mathematics literatures and shows how to use them in economic analyses. The book is divided into five parts. Part I provides a general introduction. Part II presents basics from numerical analysis on R^n,including linear equations, iterative methods, optimization, nonlinear equations, approximation methods, numerical integration and differentiation, and Monte Carlo methods. Part III covers methods for dynamic problems, including finite difference methods, projection methods, and numerical dynamic programming. Part IV covers perturbation and asymptotic solution methods. Finally, Part V covers applications to dynamic equilibrium analysis, including solution methods for perfect foresight models and rational expectation models. A web site contains supplementary material including programs and answers to exercises.

Fixed Income Analytics brings together twenty influential papers written by Kenneth Garbade with members of the Cross Markets Research Group of Bankers Trust Company between 1983 and 1990. Written by and for practitioners in the U.S. Treasury securities markets, it is one of the few, if not only, books on fixed income analysis that focuses on applicable techniques while remaining analytically rigorous.

Divided into four parts, Fixed Income Analytics presents quantitative methodologies for the analysis of fixed income securities, such as U.S. Treasury bills, notes, bonds, and STRIPS that have no credit risk. Examined in part I are basic concepts of bond yield and bond duration; in part II, yield curves and the problem of assessing relative value; in part III, topics in fixed income portfolio management associated with change in the shape of the yield curve—yield curve trades, butterfly trades, and hedging—and in part IV, the characteristics and consequences of fluctuations in the shape of the yield curve.

 

Foundations of International Macroeconomics is an innovative text that offers the first integrative modern treatment of the core issues in open economy macroeconomics and finance. With its clear and accessible style, it is suitable for first-year graduate macroeconomics courses as well as graduate courses in international macroeconomics and finance. Each chapter incorporates an extensive and eclectic array of empirical evidence. For the beginning student, these examples provide motivation and aid in understanding the practical value of the economic models developed. For advanced researchers, they highlight key insights and conundrums in the field.Topic coverage includes intertemporal consumption and investment theory, government spending and budget deficits, finance theory and asset pricing, the implications of (and problems inherent in) international capital market integration, growth, inflation and seignorage, policy credibility, real and nominal exchange rate determination, and many interesting special topics such as speculative attacks, target exchange rate zones, and parallels between immigration and capital mobility.Most main results are derived both for the small country and world economy cases. The first seven chapters cover models of the real economy, while the final three chapters incorporate the economy's monetary side, including an innovative approach to bridging the usual chasm between real and monetary models.

Downloadable instructor resources available for this title: solution manual

Diversity, Trends, and Conflicts

Latin America's Economy provides a clear, comprehensive, and accessible overview of major economic issues facing Latin America today, including balance of payments problems, inflation, stabilization, poverty, inequality, and land reform. Each chapter centers on an economic problem, presenting major economic theories about the causes and possible solutions to the problem. The authors provide numerous cross-country examples to demonstrate how individual countries are affected by economic trends or policies. Chapters also include helpful summaries and ideas on what the future may hold.


The Prudential Regulation of Banks applies modern economic theory to prudential regulation of financial intermediaries. Dewatripont and Tirole tackle the key problem of providing the right incentives to management in banks by looking at how external intervention by claimholders (holders of equity or debt) affects managerial incentives and how that intervention might ideally be implemented. Their primary focus is the regulation of commercial banks and S&Ls, but many of the implications of their theory are also valid for other intermediaries such as insurance companies, pension funds, and securities funds.

Observing that the main concern of the regulation of intermediaries is solvency (the relation between equity, debt, and asset riskiness), the authors provide institutional background and develop a case for regulation as performing the monitoring functions (screening, auditing, convenant writing, and intervention) that dispersed depositors are unable or unwilling to perform. They also illustrate the dangers of regulatory failure in a summary of the S&L crisis of the 1980s.

Following a survey of banking theory, Dewatripont and Tirole develop their model of the capital structure of banks and show how optimal regulation can be achieved using capital adequacy requirements and external intervention when banks are violated. They explain how regulation can be designed to minimize risks of accounting manipulations and to insulate bank managers from macroeconomic shocks, which are beyond their control. Finally, they provide a detailed evaluation of the existing regulation and of potential alternatives, such as rating agencies, private deposit insurance, and large private depositors. They show that these reforms are, at best, a complement, rather than a substitute, to the existing regulation which combines capital ratios with external intervention in case of insolvency.

The Prudential Regulation of Banks is part of the Walras Pareto Lectures, from the Universiy of Lausanne.


A Decision Approach

This collection of readings provides a solid grounding in the major practical business decisions that students and managers face in a global setting. The organization of the reader emphasizes general patterns of trade and investment flows, while examining in depth - the reasons for the internationalization of firms and the international dimension of various functional areas, including finance, accounting, marketing, and production.

In six sections the readings take up changes in international ownership patterns, corporate strategy, international marketing issues, the basic financial decisions and taxation issues for a multinational firm, and political risk. Each section includes an introduction that outlines the basic ideas to be discussed, as well as questions, key terms, and suggestions for further reading.

Robert Z. Aliber is Professor of International Economics and Finance at the Graduate School of Business at the University of Chicago. Reid W. Click is Assistant Professor of Economics in the Lemberg Program in International Economics and Finance at Brandeis University.

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