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Boston Review

The Future of Ecopoetics

In an age of record-breaking superstorms and environmental degradation, What Nature seeks—through poetry and critical essays—to make sense of how we interact with and are influenced by nature. This collection includes new work from such acclaimed poets as Natalie Diaz, winner of the Pablo Neruda Prize for Poetry, and Pulitzer Prize winner Jorie Graham, whose poetry often explores the consequences of global warming by creating overgrown, apocalyptic futures.

Edited by Brandon Terry

Since his death on April 4, 1968, Martin Luther King’s legacy has influenced generations of activism. Edited and with a lead essay by Brandon Terry, this volume explores what this legacy can and cannot do for activism in the present.

Edited by Junot Díaz

As the recent success of Margaret Atwood’s novel-turned-television hit Handmaid’s Tale shows us, dystopia is more than minatory fantasy; it offers a critical lens upon the present. “It is not only a kind of vocabulary and idiom,” says bestselling author and volume editor Junot Diaz. “It is a useful arena in which to begin to think about who we are becoming.”

Race Capitalism Justice urges us to embrace a vision of justice attentive to the history of slavery not through the lens of human rights, but instead through an honest accounting of how slavery was the foundation of capitalism, a legacy that continues to afflict people of color and the poor. Inspired by Cedric J.

Technology and the loss of manufacturing jobs have many worried about future mass unemployment. It is in this context that basic income, a government cash grant given unconditionally to all, has gained support from a surprising range of advocates, from Silicon Valley to labor. Our contributors explore basic income's merits, not only as a salve for financial precarity, but as a path toward racial justice and equality. Others, more skeptical, see danger in a basic income designed without attention to workers' power and the quality of work.

"In time of crisis, we summon up our strength," wrote poet Muriel Rukeyser. This collection gathers poems--from the eve of the twenty-first century to the month following Trump's election--to mark a moment of political rupture, summoning the collective strength found in the languages of resistance and memory, subversion and declamation, struggle and hope. Poetry is a counterforce. We offer these poems to readers as Rukeyser did--"not walls, but human things, human faces."

Losing and Gaining Public Goods

The President's House is Empty: Losing and Gaining Public Goods explores the question of what we--the public--owe each other as free and equal members of a democratic society. With essays by writers and thinkers like Bonnie Honig, this collection attempts to make sense of the current administration's disdain for public things like the White House, public education, and clean water.