Adrian Piper

  • Out of Order, Out of Sight, 2-vol. set

    Out of Order, Out of Sight, 2-vol. set

    Adrian Piper

    Adrian Piper joins the ranks of writer-artists who have provided much of the basic and most reliable literature on modern and contemporary art. Out of Order, Out of Sight is an artistic and intellectual autobiography and (occasionally scathing) commentary on mainstream art, art criticism, and contemporary American culture of the last twenty five years. An internationally recognized conceptual artist and the only African-American in the early conceptual art movement of the 1960s, Piper's work was strongly influenced by Sol LeWitt and first appeared in the pages of Vito Acconci's 0 to 9 magazine in 1968. Her early installations, performances, and altered photo-text pieces anticipated the genre of political montage that Barbara Kruger, Jenny Holzer, Dennis Adams, Alfredo Jaar and Cindy Sherman turned to in the 1980s and that Anna Deavere Smith explored in the 1990s. Over the years Piper's work has used many alternative perspectives and personae—the young black or white male, the upper-middle class WASP male or female—as social probes, often turning the tables on conventional expectations or assuming the attitude of the dominant culture in which she was educated. Her ambiguous position on either side of this nation's racial divide holds up for scrutiny the reaction of those who assume she is playing a part. The writings inOut of Order, Out of Sight trace the development of Piper's thinking about her artwork and the art world, and her evolving awareness of herself as a creative, racial, and gendered subject of experience situated in an often limiting and always absurd cultural and social context. The meta-art essays in Volume I document and examine her artistic practice—often humorous, frequently disturbing. The art criticism contained in Volume II confronts and analyzes the social preconditions of contemporary art practice and the cultural issues that surround it.

    • Hardcover $100.00
    • Paperback $50.00
  • Out of Order, Out of Sight, Volume 1

    Out of Order, Out of Sight, Volume 1

    Selected Writings in Meta-Art 1968-1992

    Adrian Piper

    Adrian Piper joins the ranks of writer-artists who have provided much of the basic and most reliable literature on modern and contemporary art. Out of Order, Out of Sight is an artistic and intellectual autobiography and an (occasionally scathing) commentary on mainstream art, art criticism, and American culture of the last twenty-five years. Piper is an internationally recognized conceptual artist and the only African American in the early conceptual art movement of the 1960s. The writings in Out of Order, Out of Sight trace the development of her thinking about her artwork and the art world, and her evolving awareness of herself as a creative, racial, and gendered subject situated in an often limiting and always absurd cultural and social context.

    • Hardcover $14.75
    • Paperback $29.95
  • Out of Order, Out of Sight, Volume 2

    Out of Order, Out of Sight, Volume 2

    Selected Writings in Art Criticism 1967-1992

    Adrian Piper

    Adrian Piper joins the ranks of writer-artists who have provided much of the basic and most reliable literature on modern and contemporary art. Out of Order, Out of Sight is an artistic and intellectual autobiography and an (occasionally scathing) commentary on mainstream art, art criticism, and American culture of the last twenty-five years. Piper is an internationally recognized conceptual artist and the only African American in the early conceptual art movement of the 1960s. The writings in Out of Order, Out of Sight trace the development of her thinking about her artwork and the art world, and her evolving awareness of herself as a creative, racial, and gendered subject situated in an often limiting and always absurd cultural and social context.

    • Hardcover $67.50
    • Paperback $10.75

Contributor

  • Institutional Critique

    Institutional Critique

    An Anthology of Artists' Writings

    Alexander Alberro and Blake Stimson

    An anthology of writings and projects by artists who developed and extended the genre of institutional critique.

    "Institutional critique” is an artistic practice that reflects critically on its own housing in galleries and museums and on the concept and social function of art itself. Such concerns have always been a part of modern art but took on new urgency at the end of the 1960s, when—driven by the social upheaval of the time and enabled by the tools and techniques of conceptual art—institutional critique emerged as a genre. This anthology traces the development of institutional critique as an artistic concern from the 1960s to the present by gathering writings and representative art projects of artists from across Europe and throughout the Americas who developed and extended the genre. The texts and artworks included are notable for the range of perspectives and positions they reflect and for their influence in pushing the boundaries of what is meant by institutional critique. Like Alberro and Stimson's Conceptual Art: A Critical Anthology this volume will shed new light on its subject through its critical and historical framing. Even readers already familiar with institutional critique will come away from this book with a greater and often redirected understanding of its significance.

    Artists represented include Wieslaw Borowski, Daniel Buren, Marcel Broodthaers, Groupe de Recherche d'Art Visuel, Hans Haacke, Robert Smithson, John Knight, Graciela Carnevale, Osvaldo Mateo Boglione, Guerilla Art Action Group, Art Workers' Coalition, Mierle Laderman Ukeles, Michael Asher, Mel Ramsden, Adrian Piper, The Guerrilla Girls, Laibach, Silvia Kolbowski, Andrea Fraser, Fred Wilson, Mark Dion, Maria Eichhorn, Critical Art Ensemble, Bureau d'Études, WochenKlausur, The Yes Men, Hito Steyerl, Andreas Siekmann.

    • Hardcover $39.95
    • Paperback $59.95
  • Participation

    Participation

    Claire Bishop

    Art that seeks to produce situations in which relations are formed among viewers is placed in historical and theoretical context in key writings by critics and artists.

    The desire to move viewers out of the role of passive observers and into the role of producers is one of the hallmarks of twentieth-century art. This tendency can be found in practices and projects ranging from El Lissitzky's exhibition designs to Allan Kaprow's happenings, from minimalist objects to installation art. More recently, this kind of participatory art has gone so far as to encourage and produce new social relationships. Guy Debord's celebrated argument that capitalism fragments the social bond has become the premise for much relational art seeking to challenge and provide alternatives to the discontents of contemporary life. This publication collects texts that place this artistic development in historical and theoretical context.

    Participation begins with writings that provide a theoretical framework for relational art, with essays by Umberto Eco, Bertolt Brecht, Roland Barthes, Peter Bürger, Jen-Luc Nancy, Edoaurd Glissant, and Félix Guattari, as well as the first translation into English of Jacques Rancière's influential "Problems and Transformations in Critical Art." The book also includes central writings by such artists as Lygia Clark and Hélio Oiticica, Joseph Beuys, Augusto Boal, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Thomas Hirschhorn, and Rirkrit Tiravanija. And it features recent critical and curatorial debates, with discussions by Lars Bang Larsen, Nicolas Bourriaud, Hal Foster, and Hans-Ulrich Obrist.

    Copublished with Whitechapel Art Gallery, London

    • Paperback $24.95