Akram Zaatari

  • A Conversation with an Imagined Israeli Filmmaker Named Avi Mograbi

    A Conversation with an Imagined Israeli Filmmaker Named Avi Mograbi

    Akram Zaatari

    In April 2010, during his residency at Les Laboratoires d'Aubervilliers, Akram Zaatari attempted to write, improvise, and deliver a conversation with an imagined Israeli filmmaker, giving him the name Avi Mograbi. In this conversation, Zaatari revisits photographs he made in his teenage years during the Israeli occupation of his hometown, Saida, in 1982, and imagines what an Israeli filmmaker could have experienced in the same period. Zaatari draws on an idea that comes from the filmmaker Avi Mograbi, who invented the character of a Palestinian producer in his film Happy Birthday Mr. Mograbi, played by Palestinian producer Daoud Kuttab himself.

    This text sheds light on the conflict between Israel and Lebanon, and the complexity of its recent history, of drafting borders, mobility of individuals, and the concept of “the Enemy,” while simultaneously questioning what it means to be a documentary filmmaker today.

    • Paperback $16.00

Contributor

  • The Archive

    The Archive

    Charles Merewether

    The significance of the archive in modernity and in contemporary art; writings by Sigmund Freud, Michel Foucault, Hal Foster, and others, and essays on the archival practice of such artists as Gerhard Richter, Christian Boltanski, Renée Green, and The Atlas Group.

    In the modern era, the archive—official or personal—has become the most significant means by which historical knowledge and memory are collected, stored, and recovered. The archive has thus emerged as a key site of inquiry in such fields as anthropology, critical theory, history, and, especially, recent art. Traces and testimonies of such events as World War II and ensuing conflicts, the emergence of the postcolonial era, and the fall of communism have each provoked a reconsideration of the authority given the archive—no longer viewed as a neutral, transparent site of record but as a contested subject and medium in itself.

    This volume surveys the full diversity of our transformed theoretical and critical notions of the archive—as idea and as physical presence—from Freud's "mystic writing pad" to Derrida's "archive fever"; from Christian Boltanski's first autobiographical explorations of archival material in the 1960s to the practice of artists as various as Susan Hiller, Ilya Kabakov, Thomas Hirshhorn, Renée Green, and The Atlas Group in the present.

    Not for sale in the UK and Europe.

    • Paperback $24.95