Alan S. Blinder

Alan S. Blinder is G. S. Rentschler Memorial Professor of Economics and Public Affairs at Princeton University. He is the author of The Quiet Revolution: Central Banking Goes Modern and other books.

  • Offshoring of American Jobs

    Offshoring of American Jobs

    What Response from U.S. Economic Policy?

    Jagdish N. Bhagwati, Alan S. Blinder, and Benjamin M. Friedman

    Two leading economists discuss a range of issues relating to the “offshoring” of American jobs, from free trade to unemployment levels.

    It is no surprise that many fearful American workers see the call center operator in Bangalore or the factory worker in Guangzhou as a threat to their jobs. The emergence of China and India (along with other, smaller developing countries) as economic powers has doubled the supply of labor to the integrated world economy. Economic theory suggests that such a dramatic increase in the supply of labor without an accompanying increase in the supply of capital is likely to exert downward pressure on wages for workers already in the integrated world economy, and wages for most workers in the United States have indeed stagnated or declined. In this book, leading economists Jagdish Bhagwati and Alan S. Blinder offer their perspectives on how the outsourcing of labor and the shifting of jobs to lower-wage countries affect the U.S. economy and what, if any, policy responses are required. Bhagwati, in his colorful and pithy style, focuses on globalization and free trade, while Blinder, erudite and witty, addresses the significance of labor market adjustment caused by trade. Bhagwati's and Blinder's contributions are followed by comments from economists Richard Freedman, Douglas A. Irwin, Lori G. Kletzer, and Robert Z. Lawrence. Bhagwati and Blinder then respond separately to the issues raised. Benjamin Friedman, who edited this volume (and organized the symposium that inspired it), provides an introduction.

    • Hardcover $21.00
  • Central Banking in Theory and Practice

    Central Banking in Theory and Practice

    Alan S. Blinder

    Alan S. Blinder offers the dual perspective of a leading academic macroeconomist who served a stint as Vice-Chairman of the Federal Reserve Board—one who practiced what he had long preached and then returned to academia to write about it. He tells central bankers how they might better incorporate academic knowledge and thinking into the conduct of monetary policy, and he tells scholars how they might reorient their research to be more attuned to reality and thus more useful to central bankers.

    Based on the 1996 Lionel Robbins Lectures, this readable book deals succinctly, in a nontechnical manner, with a wide variety of issues in monetary policy. The book also includes the author's suggested solution to an age-old problem in monetary theory: what it means for monetary policy to be "neutral."

    • Hardcover $24.00
    • Paperback $25.00

Contributor

  • Geometric Invariance in Computer Vision

    Joseph L. Mundy and Andrew Zisserman

    These twenty-three contributions focus on the most recent developments in the rapidly evolving field of geometric invariants and their application to computer vision. The introduction summarizes the basics of invariant theory, discusses how invariants are related to problems in computer vision, and looks at the future possibilities, particularly the notion that invariant analysis might provide a solution to the elusive problem of recognizing general curved 3D objects from an arbitrary viewpoint. The remaining chapters consist of original papers that present important developments as well as tutorial articles that provide useful background material. These chapters are grouped into categories covering algebraic invariants, nonalgebraic invariants, invariants of multiple views, and applications. An appendix provides an extensive introduction to projective geometry and its applications to basic problems in computer vision.

    • Hardcover $70.00
  • Visual Reconstruction

    Visual Reconstruction

    Andrew Blake and Andrew Zisserman

    Visual Reconstruction presents a unified and highly original approach to the treatment of continuity in vision. It introduces, analyzes, and illustrates two new concepts. The first—the weak continuity constraint—is a concise, computational formalization of piecewise continuity. It is a mechanism for expressing the expectation that visual quantities such as intensity, surface color, and surface depth vary continuously almost everywhere, but with occasional abrupt changes. The second concept—the graduated nonconvexity algorithm—arises naturally from the first. It is an efficient, deterministic (nonrandom) algorithm for fitting piecewise continuous functions to visual data. The book first illustrates the breadth of application of reconstruction processes in vision with results that the authors' theory and program yield for a variety of problems. The mathematics of weak continuity and the graduated nonconvexity (GNC) algorithm are then developed carefully and progressively.

    Contents Modeling Piecewise Continuity • Applications of Piecewise Continuous Reconstruction • Introducing Weak Continuity Constraints • Properties of the Weak String and Membrane • Properties of Weak Rod and Plate • The Discrete Problem • The Graduated Nonconvexity (GNC) Algorithm • Appendixes: Energy Calculations for the String and Membrane • Noise Performance of the Weak Elastic String • Energy Calculations for the Rod and Plate • Establishing Convexity • Analysis of the GNC Algorithm

    Visual Reconstruction is included in the Artificial Intelligence series, edited by Michael Brady and Patrick Winston.

    • Hardcover $34.00
    • Paperback $30.00