Alex Kitnick

Alex Kitnick is Assistant Professor of Art History and Visual Culture at Bard College and the editor of a previous October Files volume, Dan Graham (MIT Press).

  • Donald Judd

    Annie Ochmanek and Alex Kitnick

    Artists, architects, art historians, critics, and curators explore the work of Donald Judd as both artist and critic in essays spanning all of Judd's career.

    Donald Judd (1928–1994) was one of the most influential American artists of the postwar era. Beginning in the 1960s, he developed new ideas about art—in both his works and writings—that challenged many of modernism's core tenets by resisting the categories of painting and sculpture. Judd described this work as “specific objects.” Critics labeled it minimalism. Perhaps because Judd's own writings provide a discursive framework for his project, some of the monographic essays on his art are not widely known. This volume collects critical and scholarly writings on Judd, examining his work as both artist and critic.

    Spanning all periods of Judd's career, the essays gathered in this volume explore questions of abstraction, phenomenology, political engagement, labor, urban planning, and conservation. Written by a range of artists, architects, art historians, critics, and curators, these texts make clear Judd's relevance for a wide array of fields and disciplines, and situate him as a pivotal figure in contemporary art. They include an early consideration of Judd's work by Robert Smithson, a text on Judd's later works by curator Lynne Cooke, two essays by the art historian Rosalind Krauss, and an appraisal of Judd's writings by the artist Mel Bochner.

    Contributors

    Elizabeth C. Baker, Karl Beveridge, Mel Bochner, Yve-Alain Bois, Ian Burn, Lynne Cooke, Rosalind E. Krauss, Michael Meredith, Joshua Shannon, Robert Slifkin, Robert Smithson, Ann Temkin, Brian Walls

    • Hardcover $60.00
    • Paperback $24.95
  • Dan Graham

    Dan Graham

    Alex Kitnick

    A collection of essays on a key figure in postminimalist art, with texts spanning thirty years.

    Since the 1960s, Dan Graham's heterogeneous practice has touched on such disparate subjects as tract housing, the Shakers, punk music, and architectural theory; he has made videos, architectural models, closed-circuit installations, and glass pavilions. Graham, who came of age during the emergence of earth art, minimalism, and conceptualism, has situated his work on the borders between these different strains of contemporary practice. Although varying widely in subject and medium, Graham's artwork and writings display a consistent interest in spectatorship, public-private relationships, and the constructed environment. Graham's extensive writings on his own work (collected in Rock My Religion and Two-Way Mirror Power, both published by the MIT Press) have made him, by default, the primary interpreter of his own art. This October Files volume provides a counterweight, gathering key texts by critics and theorists that offer alternative accounts of Graham's art. The essays span thirty years and include hard-to-find texts from exhibition catalogs and journals. The authors include such distinguished theorists, critics, and artists as Benjamin H. D. Buchloh, Beatriz Colomina, Thierry de Duve, and Jeff Wall.

    • Hardcover $37.00
    • Paperback $25.00

Contributor

  • Where Are the Tiny Revolts?

    Where Are the Tiny Revolts?

    Jeanne Gerrity and Anthony Huberman

    Texts and artistic contributions that respond to questions of feminism, authorship, sexuality, and empowerment.

    Where are the tiny revolts? is the first book in a new annual series published by CCA Wattis Institute, a contemporary art center and research institute in San Francisco. Each book in the series is driven by a central question: what are we learning from artists today? Unconnected to an exhibition program, Where are the tiny revolts? is rooted in the Wattis's artist-driven research institute. It is a place to explore and share some of the texts and visual work that emerge over the course of an entire year of discussions and public programs. Instead of providing documentation of projects with artists, Where are the tiny revolts? offers other ideas, voices, and references generated by conversations with and about artists. 

    The first book in the series, informed by themes related to the work of Dodie Bellamy, revolves around questions related to contemporary forms of feminism and sexualities, the rebirth of the author, and ways in which vulnerability, perversion, vulgarity, and self-exposure can be forms of empowerment. The texts cover a broad array of styles, including memoir, theoretical essay, art historical analysis, poetry, and fiction. The visual elements are equally diverse, ranging from photographs to collage to drawing.

    • Paperback $15.00
  • Fluid Employment

    Fluid Employment

    Sam Lewitt

    Monograph that extends the artist's analysis of physical and linguistic concatenations of materials and signs which organize everyday experience.

    This monograph extends Sam Lewitt's analysis of physical and linguistic concatenations of materials and signs which organize everyday experience. The book includes a thirty-nine page frontispiece dealing with the ossified remnants and shifting lexicon of Fluid Employment—a work that takes the form of a disposable, self-contained, and unsustainable evaporation system for a magnetic fluid used in a myriad of manufacturing applications, cheap fans, and industrial magnets. Art historian Alex Kitnick and philosopher Nathan Brown reflect on Lewitt's complication of conventions of informational display, the materiality of literacy, and the politics of contradiction.

    • Paperback $26.00