Anselm Franke

Anselm Franke has been Head of Visual Arts and Film at Haus der Kulturen der Welt (HKW) since 2013.

  • Parapolitics

    Parapolitics

    Cultural Freedom and the Cold War

    Anselm Franke, Nida Ghouse, Paz Guevara, and Antonia Majaca

    An examination of the use of modernism in the twentieth-century battle for US hegemony, through the activities of the CIA-funded Congress for Cultural Freedom.

    Parapolitics confronts the contemporary fate of intellectual autonomy and artistic freedom by revisiting the use of modernism in the twentieth-century battle for US hegemony. It builds on a major exhibition at Haus der Kulturen der Welt (2017–18) that took as its starting point the Congress for Cultural Freedom (CCF)—an organization covertly funded by the Central Intelligence Agency in order to steer the Left away from its remaining commitment to communism. Paying particular attention to CCF activities in the non-European world during a period of decolonization and the Civil Rights Movement, Parapolitics assembles archival documentation from five continents alongside a selection of historical artworks to explore the context in which artists negotiated the framing and meaning of their work. A rich reference book for future researchers and everybody interested in the legacy of modernism, the publication also presents more than thirty newly commissioned contributions by contemporary artists and scholars.

    • Hardcover $35.00
  • Love and Ethnology

    Love and Ethnology

    The Colonial Dialectic of Sensitivity (after Hubert Fichte)

    Diedrich Diederichsen and Anselm Franke

    Essays, artistic text contributions, and curatorial statements on the German writer Hubert Fichte's fascination with Afro-diasporic arts and religions.

    Can the ethnological observations and feelings on Afro-diasporic cultures from a German writer be “restituted”? What are the possibilities and limits of using self-reflection and gay sexuality as research tools? Since 2017, the exhibition and publication project Hubert Fichte: Love and Ethnology has followed this question through Hubert Fichte's cycle of novels History of Sensitivity. Fascinated by Afro-diasporic arts and religions, Fichte (1935–1986) traveled to cities including Salvador da Bahia, Santiago de Chile, Dakar, New York, and Lisbon. Translations of Fichte's novels became the basis for critical local receptions and new artistic works in these cities.

    This book brings together essays, artistic text contributions, and curatorial statements from the projects in Salvador da Bahia, Rio de Janeiro, Santiago de Chile, Dakar, New York, and Lisbon, as well as extensive photo series depicting the artistic works from the exhibition at Haus der Kulturen der Welt.

    Love and Ethnology is a collaboration between Goethe-Institut and Haus der Kulturen der Welt, supported by S. Fischer Stiftung and S. Fischer Verlag.

    • Hardcover $35.00
  • Secret Modernity

    Secret Modernity

    Selected Writings and Interviews 1981–2009

    Peter Friedl and Anselm Franke

    In order to remain autonomous, at some point art began to copy everything that is not autonomous. There was no lack of supply and demand since power, as we know, can only be held over the production of truth or else it does not function. –Peter Friedl

    Since the early 1980s, Friedl has written on a variety of subjects. The book Secret Modernity: Selected Writings and Interviews 1981–2009 compiles for the first time a representative selection of his (partly unpublished) texts, along with a series of interviews. As in his artworks, Friedl's writings quote from and rework multiple genres. He offers reviews and portraits of George Sand and Clarice Lispector, of Alighiero Boetti and Jean-Luc Godard; articles and documents contributing to theater and film history, which examine the work of, among others, Richard Foreman, Robert Wilson, or Glauber Rocha; as well as comments and reflections on his own projects. Alongside these are essays delving deep into the past, exploring mainly colonial history and its paradoxical traces in the present: narratives about Haiti, South Africa, and Italy's repressed colonial rule in Africa.

    Peter Friedl (b. 1960) lives in Berlin. He has participated in documenta X and 12 (1997, 2007); the 48th Venice Biennale (1999); the 3rd Berlin Biennial for Contemporary Art (2004); the 2nd International Biennial of Contemporary Art, Seville (2006); Manifesta 7, Trento (2008); the 7th Gwangju Biennale (2008); the 28th Bienal de São Paulo (2008), and the Tirana International Contemporary Art Biennial (2009). His solo exhibitions include “Blow Job” at Extra City Kunsthal Antwerpen (2008); “Working” at Kunsthalle Basel (2008); the retrospective survey “Work 1964–2006” at Museu d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona, Miami Art Central, and Musée d'Art Contemporain, Marseille (2006–07); and “Out of the Shadows” at Witte de With, Center for Contemporary Art, Rotterdam (2004). Since the 1980s, he has published numerous essays and books, including Four or Five Roses (Lukas & Sternberg, 2004) and Working at Copan (Sternberg Press, 2007).

    Co-published with Extra City Kunsthal Antwerpen

    • Hardcover $29.95

Contributor

  • Theater, Garden, Bestiary

    Theater, Garden, Bestiary

    A Materialist History of Exhibitions

    Tristan Garcia and Vincent Normand

    Proposing a history of exhibitions sourced from a wide corpus reaching beyond the framework of art institutions.

    This volume gathers and expands upon the results of the research project “Theater, Garden, Bestiary: A Materialist History of Exhibitions,” held at ECAL/University of Art and Design Lausanne, and proposes a history of exhibitions sourced from a wide corpus reaching beyond the framework of art institutions. It undertakes a transdisciplinary history at the nexus of art history, science studies, and philosophy, exploring the role the exhibition played in the construction of the conceptual categories of modernity, and outlines a historiographical model that conceptualizes the exhibition as both an aesthetic and an epistemic site.

    Contributors

    Etienne Chambaud, Elitza Dulguerova, Anselm Franke, Tristan Garcia, Fabien Giraud & Raphaël Siboni, Dorothea von Hantelmann, Yuk Hui, Pierre Huyghe, Sami Khatib, Jeremy Lecomte, Stéphane Lojkine, Rafael Mandressi, Vincent Normand, Peter Osborne, Filipa Ramos, Juliane Rebentisch, João Ribas, Pamela Rosenkranz, Anna-Sophie Springer, Lucy Steeds, Olivier Surel, Etienne Turpin, Kim West, Charles Wolfe

    • Paperback $33.00
  • Intersubjectivity, Volume 2

    Intersubjectivity, Volume 2

    Scripting the Human

    Lou Cantor and Katherine Rochester

    Intersubjectivity considered as both historical phenomenon and nascent mode of present-day relation.

    This collection of essays considers the relationship between performance, subjectivity, and human agency. Encompassing both historical and speculative perspectives, this book explores the ways in which nonhuman (or trans/post-human) entities complicate notions of subjectivity and exert intersubjective pressures of their own on social, political, scientific, and philosophical discourses. Ranging from continental philosophy to more recent formulations that derive from systems theory, trans identity, and the emergent field of bot pedagogy, It approaches intersubjectivity as both historical phenomenon and nascent mode of present-day relation.

    Contributions by Anselm Franke, Avram Alpert, Boris Groys, Erika Landström, Goshka Macuga, Hannah Black, Harry Burke, Jeanne Vaccaro, Josh Kline, Lucky Dragons, Mashinka Firunts Hakopian, Natasha Stagg, Sarah Harrison, Victoria Ivanova

    • Paperback $22.00
  • The Black City

    The Black City

    Glosses

    Hubert Fichte

    A portrait via interviews and essays of New York City at the end of the 1970s as the center of the African diaspora.

    “Fichte did away with the opposition between objective and poetic writing—his heightened objectivity becomes poetic, his poetry journalistic. He wrote to fight against bigotry and provincialism, and developed approaches in the 1970s that are discussed today in queer studies and postcolonialism.”—Diedrich Diederichsen

    The Black City is a portrait of New York City written by Hubert Fichte between 1978 and 1980. One of Germany's most important postwar authors, Fichte researched the city as the center of the African diaspora, conducting interviews and composing essays about syncretism in culture and the arts, material living conditions in the city, and political and individual struggles based on race, class, and sexuality. His interview partners include Michael Chisolm, arts educator and coordinator of the Black Emergency Cultural Coalition; German émigré and artist Lil Picard; photographer Richard Avedon; Léopold Joseph, publisher of the exile newspaper Haiti Observateur; and Teiji Ito, composer and Vodou initiate. The book opens with notes on an exhibition of Haitian art at the Brooklyn Museum, and closes with a self-reflective literary analysis of Herodotus, the first white European to write extensively of his travels and (desirous) encounters in Africa.

    Often compared to the work of Jean Genet and Kathy Acker, Fichte's novels and nonfiction are exuberant and erudite, contesting the stylistic and ethnographic norms of the time to locate a “utopic potential” for poetic and political revolution in the cultural heritage and contemporary life of the African diaspora. Fichte's writing in The Black City provocatively exposes the complexities of its author's subjectivity in a manner that underscores the singularity of his writing, while prompting questions about how notions of exploitation, authority, and authenticity manifest themselves in pseudo-ethnographic practices. Translated into English for the first time, The Black City is part of Fichte's multivolume experimental literary cycle, The History of Sensitivity, which was left unfinished due to his untimely death in 1986. 

    Published in conjunction with the project “Hubert Fichte: Love and Ethnology,” a collaboration between the Goethe-Institut and Haus der Kulturen der Welt (HKW), Berlin, supported by S. Fischer Stiftung and S. Fischer Verlag. 

    • Hardcover $29.95