Anthony Huberman

Anthony Huberman is the Director and Chief Curator of the Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts in San Francisco and Founding Director of the Artist's Institute in New York.

  • Why Are They So Afraid of the Lotus?

    Why Are They So Afraid of the Lotus?

    A Series of Open Questions

    Anthony Huberman, Kim Nguyen, and Jeanne Gerrity

    A conceptual "course packet" of readings around and inspired by the work of Trinh T. Minh-ha.

    Driven by the central question “What are we learning from artists today?” the second volume of A Series of Open Questions is informed by themes found in the work of Trinh T. Minh-ha, such as cultural hybridization and fluidity of identity, digital and migratory aesthetics, memory and landscape, decentered realities, feminist approaches to storytelling, meditations on death and myth, post-coloniality and decolonization, and women's work as related to cultural politics. The contributions to Why Are They So Afraid of the Lotus? embody Trinh's own weariness around categorization and investigate the ways production can come from and be based in positions of unknowing.

    • Paperback $15.00
  • Where Are the Tiny Revolts?

    Where Are the Tiny Revolts?

    Jeanne Gerrity and Anthony Huberman

    Texts and artistic contributions that respond to questions of feminism, authorship, sexuality, and empowerment.

    Where are the tiny revolts? is the first book in a new annual series published by CCA Wattis Institute, a contemporary art center and research institute in San Francisco. Each book in the series is driven by a central question: what are we learning from artists today? Unconnected to an exhibition program, Where are the tiny revolts? is rooted in the Wattis's artist-driven research institute. It is a place to explore and share some of the texts and visual work that emerge over the course of an entire year of discussions and public programs. Instead of providing documentation of projects with artists, Where are the tiny revolts? offers other ideas, voices, and references generated by conversations with and about artists. 

    The first book in the series, informed by themes related to the work of Dodie Bellamy, revolves around questions related to contemporary forms of feminism and sexualities, the rebirth of the author, and ways in which vulnerability, perversion, vulgarity, and self-exposure can be forms of empowerment. The texts cover a broad array of styles, including memoir, theoretical essay, art historical analysis, poetry, and fiction. The visual elements are equally diverse, ranging from photographs to collage to drawing.

    • Paperback $15.00
  • Dodie Bellamy Is on Our Mind

    Dodie Bellamy Is on Our Mind

    Jeanne Gerrity and Anthony Huberman

    Examining the genre-bending writing of Dodie Bellamy, whose work has focused on sexuality, politics, feminism, narrative experimentation, and all things queer.

    Dodie Bellamy (b. 1951, in North Hammond, Indiana) has lived and worked in San Francisco since 1978. A vital contributor to the Bay Area's avant-garde literary scene, Bellamy is a novelist and poet whose work has focused on sexuality, politics, feminism, narrative experimentation, and all things queer. In her words, she champions “the vulnerable, the fractured, the disenfranchised, the fucked-up.”

    Dodie Bellamy Is on Our Mind is the first major publication to address Bellamy's prolific career as a genre-bending writer. Megan Milks made several trips to San Francisco in order to spend time with Bellamy and craft a provocative and fascinating profile of the writer. Originally delivered as a lecture at the Wattis Institute, Andrew Durbin's text takes the form of a personal essay, expertly weaving anecdotes of his own encounters with Bellamy's writing with insights into broader themes in her work. Academic Kaye Mitchell takes a close look at the role of shame and its relationship to femininity in particular texts by Bellamy. And Bellamy and her late husband Kevin Killian offer deeply personal, emotionally wrenching ruminations on topics from the mundane (drawing) to the profound (mortality). These texts, alongside archival photos and a complete bibliography make, this book an important compendium on Bellamy.

    • Paperback $25.00

Contributor

  • More Heat than Light

    More Heat than Light

    Sam Lewitt

    A book developed in conjunction with the eponymous exhibitions consisting of oversized custom flexible heating circuits, used for environmental regulation in the sealed environments.

    More Heat Than Light is a book developed in conjunction with the eponymous exhibitions, co-organized for 2015–16 by the Wattis Institute, San Francisco and Kunsthalle Basel. The work, exhibited at both of those institutions as well as an anonymous Airbnb rental apartment in New York, consists of oversized custom flexible heating circuits, used for environmental regulation in the sealed environments of equipment as diverse as medical equipment and food trays, in satellites and chemical vats. The heating circuits in More Heat Than Light are several times their conventional size, scaled-up and designed to draw their power and maximize the energy resources of the electrical circuits allotted for lighting within the sites they are inserted into. Energy allotted for stable artificial light is converted in this work into diffuse uneven warmth. This process is circumscribed with a strict regime of documentation. Each iteration of the exhibition is documented with a live feed from a thermal camera. The book itself, designed in collaboration with Geoff Kaplan, is conceived as a stand-alone object utilizing images taken with the thermal camera as well as research material relating to the work. On one hand, it picks-up the structure of a log of core temperatures of the sort compiled for analysis by the logistics and distribution industry. On the other hand, its format and layout utilize a two-color gradient printing process that interrupts the logical, spatial organization of the gridded screen-shots. This opposition between grid and gradient are staged in the book along a fragmentary work of theoretical fiction by Mark von Schlegell, as well as texts by Anthony Huberman, Elena Filipovic, Melanie Gilligan, and Sam Lewitt, all offering insight into some of the core themes and interpretations of the work. 

    • Paperback $42.00