April Lamm

April Lamm is an art critic.

  • An Exhibition Always Hides Another Exhibition

    An Exhibition Always Hides Another Exhibition

    Texts on Hans Ulrich Obrist

    April Lamm

    Essays and portraits on the career and influence of curator Hans Ulrich Obrist.

    Hans Ulrich Obrist is the Kim Kardashian of the art world. That sounds absurd to those of you who know him. But there are many who know just his name or just his initials, HUO. This book is here to tell you more. What does it mean to be HUO? What does it mean to be a curator? Is there anything less interesting to me (or you?) than selecting artists for exhibitions? In an era of, let's call it, “boutique” art shows, the issue seems about as relevant as Diet Coke (and the Kardashians). But if anything, Hans is the Real Thing. Hans is Coca-Cola. In this book you'll find personal, anecdotal remarks on HUO's character, republished texts, and portraits (by artists including Alex Katz) that give context to the questions that frame the book: “Who is HUO?” and “What does HUO do?” More so, “What has he done?” If the art world were to seek out a supreme leader who was benevolent, kind, and fair, HUO would be it.

    Contributors Etel Adnan, Manthia Diawara Sophia Al-Maria, Etel Adnan, Ed Atkins, Alan Pauls, Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster, D. T. Max, Jacques Herzog, Joseph Grigely, Yoko Ono, Ho Rui An, Michael Diers, Douglas Coupland, Bruce Altshuler, Agnès Varda, Andrew Durbin, Sophie Collins, Daniel Birnbaum, Boris Groys, Bruno Latour, Adam Thirlwell, Wong Hoy Cheong, Raqs Media Collective, Michael Bracewell, and Stefano Boeri.

    Portraits of HUO by Alex Katz, Jimmie Durham, Adrián Villar Rojas, Pascale Marthine Tayou, Cui Jie, Gerhard Richter, Giorgio Griffa, Sophia Al-Maria, Jamian Juliano Villani, Torbjørn Rødland, Simone Fattal, and Monir Shahroudy Farmanfarmaian

    • Paperback $22.00
  • Sharp Tongues, Loose Lips, Open Eyes, Ears to the Ground

    Sharp Tongues, Loose Lips, Open Eyes, Ears to the Ground

    Hans-Ulrich Obrist and April Lamm

    With an ode by Olafur Eliasson

    Following Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Curating* *But Were Afraid to Ask, this second volume in the series on international curator Hans Ulrich Obrist presents a selection of his key writings from the past two decades, which elaborate on the manifold thinkers, curators, and events that influence his interdisciplinary practice of exhibition making.

    The collected essays form the compartments of Obrist's curatorial toolbox, along with elucidating his views on stewardship, patronage, and art itself. Influences and interlocutors cited and discussed here include, among others, Alexander Dorner, Édouard Glissant, Claude Lévi-Strauss, Jean-François Lyotard, Dominique de Menil, Josef Ortner, Cedric Price, Sir John Soane, and Harald Szeemann.

    • Paperback $16.00
  • Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Curating*

    Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Curating*

    *But Were Afraid to Ask

    Hans-Ulrich Obrist and April Lamm

    Everything you ever wanted to know about Hans Ulrich Obrist but were afraid to ask has been asked by the sixteen practitioners in this book. Spanning the beginning of his “career” as a young curator in his Zurich kitchen to his time most recently as the Co-Director of Exhibitions and Programs, and Director of International Projects at the Serpentine Gallery in London, the book is a “production of reality conversations.” It undertakes the impossible: pinning down this peripatetic curator, attempting to map his psychogeography so that silences may be transcribed. In a sense, it organizes a “protest against forgetting” and affirms the sagacity of an artist who told this dontstop curator “don't go” when he “contemplated leaving the art world” for other fields—“to go beyond the fear of pooling knowledge”—in lieu of bringing other fields into the (then) hermetic art world.

    Contributors Jean-Max Colard, Robert Fleck, Jefferson Hack, Nav Haq, Noah Horowitz, Sophia Krzys Acord, Brendan McGetrick, Markus Miessen, Ingo Niermann, Paul O'Neill, Philippe Parreno & Alex Poots, Juri Steiner, Gavin Wade, Enrique Walker

    • Paperback $16.00
  • ...dontstopdontstopdontstopdontstop

    ...dontstopdontstopdontstopdontstop

    Hans-Ulrich Obrist and April Lamm

    Writings from 1990–2006 by visionary curator Hans Ulrich Obrist.

    “If art takes place in a contemporary art museum (where we expect it), what does it mean? Art should not be about filling spaces, but about necessities and urgencies.” Such are the principles conveyed by the visionary Hans Ulrich Obrist, seeking out ways to reinvent and invent museums of the 21st century. Newly edited by April Lamm, gathered together here are the seminal texts written by (what Douglas Gordon once aptly described) a “dontstop” curator. His exhibitions present, as Rem Koolhaas writes in his preface to these prefaces, “a heroic effort to preserve the traces of intelligence of the last 50 years, to make sense of the seemingly disjointed, a hedge against the systematic forgetting that is hidden at the core of the information age and which may, in fact, be its secret agenda....”

    A compendium of texts written between 1990 and 2006, here are exhibition case studies – “Hotel Carlton Palace,” “Cities on the Move,” “Do It,” “Utopia Station” – involving some of the more thought-provoking artists, architects, and scientists of our time such as Paul Chan, Alexander Dorner, Olafur Eliasson, Cao Fei, Hans-Peter Feldmann, Peter Fischli & David Weiss, Douglas Gordon, Pierre Huyghe, Qingyung Ma, Philippe Parreno, Cedric Price, Luc Steels, Rirkrit Tiravanija, among others, from Zurich to Guangzhou and back again. Designed by M/M (Paris), the cover depicts an original Gerhard Richter over-painted picture of Obrist himself. A must-have for anyone interested in the unusual strategies of a curator-at-large.

    • Paperback $19.95
  • Chronology

    Chronology

    Daniel Birnbaum and April Lamm

    “Is it the intentionality described by phenomenology and the ambiguous flesh of the active viewer who enters the work of art and fully explores its most extreme possibilities that determine the limits of possible subjectivation? Or is it the work itself that defines the parameters of new potential forms of subjectivity, perhaps involving modes of awareness that dodge the framework of phenomenology? Such are the questions that constitute the ultimate horizon of this essay.”—Daniel Birnbaum

    A philosophical essay on time, phenomenology and beyond, Daniel Birnbaum's Chronology was presented in frieze as a “compelling and sophisticated take on the common theme of Deleuzian immanence.” Whereas many theoretical books littering the bookshops of art institutions are laudations of excess, Birnbaum's convictions presented in Chronology cut a way through the “caesuras of non-meaning and blankness into the thick web of sense.”

    The works of artists such as Stan Douglas, Eija-Liisa Ahtila, Doug Aitken, Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster, Tacita Dean, Darren Almond, Tobias Rehberger, Pierre Huyghe, and Philippe Parreno are scrutinized as so many attempts to capture the very dialectic of time itself. As Brian Dillon writes in frieze, “Birnbaum's notion of an art of unpredictable becoming … has its aporias too. A brief aside apropos Matthew Barney – to the effect that his art is all meaning, all of the time – is quite telling.”

    Daniel Birnbaum is Director of the Städelschule in Frankfurt am Main and Director of its Portikus gallery. He is also a member of the board of the Institut für Sozialforschung. A contributing editor of Artforum, he is the author of numerous texts on art and philosophy.

    • Paperback $19.95