Atish R. Ghosh

Atish R. Ghosh is the Historian of the International Monetary Fund.Ghosh is coauthor (with Holger C. Wolf and Anne-Marie Gulde) of Exchange Rate Regimes: Choice and Consequences (MIT Press, 2003).

  • Taming the Tide of Capital Flows

    Taming the Tide of Capital Flows

    A Policy Guide

    Atish R. Ghosh, Jonathan D. Ostry, and Mahvash S. Qureshi

    A comprehensive examination of policy measures intended to help emerging markets contend with large and volatile capital flows.

    While always episodic in nature, capital flows to emerging market economies have been especially volatile since the global financial crisis. After peaking at $680 billion in 2007, flows to emerging markets turned negative at the onset of crisis in 2008, then rebounded only to recede again during the U.S. sovereign debt downgrade in 2011. Since then, flows have continued to swing wildly, leaving emerging market policy makers wondering whether they can put in place policies during the inflow phase that will soften the blow when flows subsequently recede. This book offers the first comprehensive treatment of policy measures intended to help emerging markets contend with large and volatile capital flows. The authors, all IMF experts, explain that, in the spirit of liberalization and deregulation in the 1980s and 1990s, many emerging market governments eliminated capital inflow controls along with outflow controls. By 2012, however, capital inflow controls were again acknowledged as legitimate policy tools. Focusing on the macroeconomic and financial-stability risks associated with capital flows, the authors combine theoretical and empirical analysis to consider the interaction between monetary, exchange rate, macroprudential, and capital control policies to mitigate these risks. They examine the effectiveness of various policy tools, discuss the practical considerations and multilateral implications of their use, and provide concrete policy advice for dealing with capital inflows.

    • Hardcover $45.00 £38.00
  • Currency Boards in Retrospect and Prospect

    Currency Boards in Retrospect and Prospect

    Holger C. Wolf, Atish R. Ghosh, Helge Berger, and Anne-Marie Gulde

    An authoritative analysis that employs economic theory, cross-country empirical comparison, and case studies to analyze the effect of currency boards on inflation, output growth and macroeconomic performance.

    Currency boards, more so than other exchange rate regimes, have come in and out of fashion. Defined by a fixed exchange rate with full convertibility, central bank liabilities backed with foreign exchange reserves, and a high cost of exiting the regime, currency boards were common in colonial times—until most were cast off as countries gained independence after World War II. In the 1990s, currency boards enjoyed a revival as the cornerstone of various macroeconomic stabilization programs—including many in central and eastern European transition economies—only to fall into disfavor again with the collapse of the Argentine regime in 2002. The authors of Currency Boards in Retrospect and Prospect take a balanced look at the effects of currency board regimes on inflation, output growth, and macroeconomic performance more generally. Drawing on historical experience, economic theory, cross-country empirical analysis, and case studies of currency boards in Argentina, Estonia, Lithuania, Bulgaria, and Bosnia and Herzegovina, the authors conclude that currency boards deliver significant reductions in inflation compared to other regimes and do not seem to result in slower growth or a markedly higher vulnerability to crisis.

    • Hardcover $9.75 £7.99
  • Exchange Rate Regimes

    Exchange Rate Regimes

    Choices and Consequences

    Atish R. Ghosh, Anne-Marie Gulde, and Holger C. Wolf

    An empirical study of exchange rate regimes based on data compiled from 150 member countries of the International Monetary Fund over the past thirty years.

    Few topics in international economics are as controversial as the choice of an exchange rate regime. Since the breakdown of the Bretton Woods system in the early 1970s, countries have adopted a wide variety of regimes, ranging from pure floats at one extreme to currency boards and dollarization at the other. While a vast theoretical literature explores the choice and consequences of exchange rate regimes, the abundance of possible effects makes it difficult to establish clear relationships between regimes and common macroeconomic policy targets such as inflation and growth.

    This book takes a systematic look at the evidence on macroeconomic performance under alternative exchange rate regimes, drawing on the experience of some 150 member countries of the International Monetary Fund over the past thirty years. Among other questions, it asks whether pegging the exchange rate leads to lower inflation, whether floating exchange rates are associated with faster output growth, and whether pegged regimes are particularly prone to currency and other crises. The book draws on history and theory to delineate the debate and on standard statistical methods to assess the empirical evidence, and includes a CD-ROM containing the data set used.

    • Hardcover $8.75 £6.99