Ben Bernanke

Ben S. Bernanke is the Howard Harrison and Gabrielle Snyder Beck Professor of Economics and Public Affairs at Princeton University.

  • NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1999

    NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1999

    Ben Bernanke and Julio J. Rotemberg

    The goals of the annual NBER Macroeconomics Conference are to present, extend, and apply frontier work in macroeconomics and to stimulate work by macroeconomists in policy issues. Each paper in the Annual is followed by comments and discussion.

    The goals of the annual NBER Macroeconomics Conference are to present, extend, and apply frontier work in macroeconomics and to stimulate work by macroeconomists in policy issues. Each paper in the Annual is followed by comments and discussion.

    • Hardcover $11.75 £9.99
    • Paperback $32.00 £22.95
  • NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1997

    NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1997

    Ben Bernanke and Julio J. Rotemberg

    The goals of the annual NBER Macroeconomics Conference are to present, extend, and apply frontier work in macroeconomics and to stimulate work by macroeconomists in policy issues. Each paper in the Annual is followed by comments and discussion.

    Contributors Christopher Carroll, Wendy Dunn, Martin Feldstein, Michael Gavin, Martin Goodfriend, Robert King, Peter Klenow, Roberto Perotti, Andres Rodriguez, Julio Rotemberg, Andrew Samwick, Michael Woodford

    • Hardcover $40.00
    • Paperback $32.00 £23.95
  • NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1996

    NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1996

    Ben Bernanke and Julio J. Rotemberg

    This is the eleventh volume in a series of annuals from the National Bureau of Economic Research that are designed to present, extend, and apply frontier work in macroeconomics, and to encourage and stimulate work by macroeconomists on current policy issues. These contributions offer a good sample of the current issues and exciting research directions in macroeconomics.

    Contents Credit, Business Investment, and Output Fluctuations in Japan, Nobuhiro Kiyotaki and Kenneth D. West • Causes and Consequences of Imperfections in the Consumer Price Index, Matthew D. Shapiro and David Wilcox • A Scorecard for Indexed Government Debt, John Y. Campbell and Robert J. Shiller • Technology Improvements and Productivity Slowdowns: Another Crazy Explanation, Andreas Hornstein and Per Krusell • Are Currency Crises Self-Fulfilling?, Paul Krugman • Inequity and Growth, Roland Benabou

    • Hardcover $11.75 £8.95
    • Paperback $7.75 £6.95
  • NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1995

    Ben Bernanke

    Contents Wage Inequality and Regional Unemployment Persistence: U.S. vs. Europe, Guiseppe Bertola and Andreas Ichino • Capital Utilization and Returns to Scale, Craig Burnside, Martin Eichenbaum, and Sergio Rebelo • Banks and Derivatives, Gary Gorton and Richard Rosen • Exchange-Rate-Based Stabilizations: Theory and Evidence, Sergio Rebelo and Carlos Vegh • Inflation Indicators and Inflation Policy, Stephen Cecchetti • Recent Central Bank Reforms and the Role of Price Stability as the Sole Objective of Monetary Policy, Carl Walsh • Is Central Bank Independence (and Low Inflation) the Result of Effective Financial Opposition to Inflation?, Adam Posen • The Unending Quest for Monetary Salvation, Stanley Fischer

    • Hardcover $40.00 £29.95
    • Paperback $34.00 £27.00

Contributor

  • Progress and Confusion

    Progress and Confusion

    The State of Macroeconomic Policy

    Olivier Blanchard, Raghuram Rajan, Kenneth Rogoff, and Lawrence H. Summers

    Leading economists consider the shape of future economic policy: will it resume the pre-crisis consensus, or contend with the post-crisis “new normal”?

    What will economic policy look like once the global financial crisis is finally over? Will it resume the pre-crisis consensus, or will it be forced to contend with a post-crisis “new normal”? Have we made progress in addressing these issues, or does confusion remain? In April of 2015, the International Monetary Fund gathered leading economists, both academics and policymakers, to address the shape of future macroeconomic policy. This book is the result, with prominent figures—including Ben Bernanke, John Taylor, and Paul Volcker—offering essays that address topics that range from the measurement of systemic risk to foreign exchange intervention.

    The chapters address whether we have entered a “new normal” of low growth, negative real rates, and deflationary pressures, with contributors taking opposing views; whether new financial regulation has stemmed systemic risk; the effectiveness of macro prudential tools; monetary policy, the choice of inflation targets, and the responsibilities of central banks; fiscal policy, stimulus, and debt stabilization; the volatility of capital flows; and the international monetary and financial system, including the role of international policy coordination.

    In light of these discussions, is there progress or confusion regarding the future of macroeconomic policy? In the final chapter, volume editor Olivier Blanchard answers: both. Many lessons have been learned; but, as the chapters of the book reveal, there is no clear agreement on several key issues.

    Contributors Viral V. Acharya, Anat R. Admati, Zeti Akhtar Aziz, Ben Bernanke, Olivier Blanchard, Marco Buti, Ricardo J. Caballero, Agustín Carstens, Jaime Caruana, J. Bradford DeLong, Martin Feldstein, Vitor Gaspar, John Geanakoplos, Philipp Hildebrand, Gill Marcus, Maurice Obstfeld, Luiz Awazu Pereira da Silva, Rafael Portillo, Raghuram Rajan, Kenneth Rogoff, Robert E. Rubin, Lawrence H. Summers, Hyun Song Shin, Lars E. O. Svensson, John B. Taylor, Paul Tucker, José Viñals, Paul A. Volcker

    • Hardcover $31.95 £25.00
    • Paperback $21.95 £16.99
  • Understanding Inflation and the Implications for Monetary Policy

    Understanding Inflation and the Implications for Monetary Policy

    A Phillips Curve Retrospective

    Jeff Fuhrer, Yolanda K. Kodrzycki, Jane Sneddon Little, and Giovanni P. Olivei

    Current perspectives on the Phillips curve, a core macroeconomic concept that treats the relationship between inflation and unemployment.

    In 1958, economist A. W. Phillips published an article describing what he observed to be the inverse relationship between inflation and unemployment; subsequently, the “Phillips curve” became a central concept in macroeconomic analysis and policymaking. But today's Phillips curve is not the same as the original one from fifty years ago; the economy, our understanding of price setting behavior, the determinants of inflation, and the role of monetary policy have evolved significantly since then. In this book, some of the top economists working today reexamine the theoretical and empirical validity of the Phillips curve in its more recent specifications. The contributors consider such questions as what economists have learned about price and wage setting and inflation expectations that would improve the way we use and formulate the Phillips curve, what the Phillips curve approach can teach us about inflation dynamics, and how these lessons can be applied to improving the conduct of monetary policy.

    Contributors Lawrence Ball, Ben Bernanke, Oliver Blanchard, V. V. Chari, William T. Dickens, Stanley Fischer, Jeff Fuhrer, Jordi Gali, Michael T. Kiley, Robert G. King, Donald L. Kohn, Yolanda K. Kodrzycki, Jane Sneddon Little, Bartisz Mackowiak, N. Gregory Mankiw, Virgiliu Midrigan, Giovanni P. Olivei, Athanasios Orphanides, Adrian R. Pagan, Christopher A. Pissarides, Lucrezia Reichlin, Paul A. Samuelson, Christopher A. Sims, Frank R. Smets, Robert M. Solow, Jürgen Stark, James H. Stock, Lars E. O. Svensson, John B. Taylor, Mark W. Watson

    • Hardcover $19.75 £14.99