Ben Zissimos

Ben Zissimos is Associate Professor of Economics at the University of Exeter Business School, Exeter, UK.

  • The WTO and Economic Development

    Ben Zissimos

    Economists offer rigorous quantitative analyses of how the institutional design and purpose of the WTO (and its progenitor, the GATT) affect economic development.

    The World Trade Organization (WTO) was established partly to support economic development in developing countries through international trade. This goal has been elusive, with some questioning the WTO's ability to achieve such a goal. In this volume, leading scholars in the economics of international trade offer rigorous quantitative analyses of how the institutional design and purpose of the WTO (and its progenitor, the GATT) affect economic development.

    The volume begins with analyses of market access concessions that have been or could be exchanged between developing and developed countries, from a formal framework for incorporating non-tariff measures into a model for analyzing a multilateral trade agreement to an examination of the MFN (most-favored nation) free rider problem. Contributors then develop new theoretical and econometric approaches for understanding key aspects of trade liberalization under the GATT/WTO that are of particular relevance to economic development, considering such topics as achieving cooperation in eliminating prohibitive trade barriers and the effect of China's export subsidies on its dramatic growth in exports. Finally, the book considers two significant new issues that arose from the Uruguay round, from which the WTO was formed: the TRIPS agreement, regulating intellectual property; and the resolution of trade disputes with and without litigation. Taken together, these analyses shed new light on the relationship between trade liberalization and economic development as well as the WTO's effectiveness.

    • Hardcover $60.00 £50.00

Contributor

  • The Economics of Conflict

    The Economics of Conflict

    Theory and Empirical Evidence

    Karl Wärneryd

    Economists offer a rational-choice perspective on conflict, using approaches that range from the game theoretic to the experimental.

    Modern economics has largely ignored the issue of outright conflict as an alternative way of allocating goods, assuming instead the existence of well-defined property rights enforced by an undefined third party. And yet even in ostensibly peaceful market transactions, conflict exists as an outside option, sometimes constraining the outcomes reached through voluntary agreement. In this volume, economists offer a crucial rational-choice perspective on conflict, using methodological approaches that range from the game theoretic to the experimental.

    Several chapters use the recently developed contest success function to model conflict, examining such topics as alliance formation, regional conflicts under fiscal federalism, coups d'etat in developing countries, and the correlation between conflict and economic growth in Bolivia. Other chapters consider subjects that include the link between occupational choices and antigovernment activity in Afghanistan, social unrest and the IMF's Structural Adjustment Program, and the effect of Tajikistan's civil war on ex-combatants' capacity for trust and cooperation.

    Taken together, these contributions show that economics needs a theory of conflict to understand both outright conflict and transactions in the shadow of conflict. But beyond this, they show that the study of conflict also needs the rigorous, methodology-based perspectives of economics.

    Contributors Vincenzo Bove, Raul Caruso, Alessandra Cassar, Jacopo Costa, Maria Cubel, Leandro Elia, Jose Luis Evia, Davide Fiaschi, Pauline Grosjean, Ruixue Jia, Kai A. Konrad, Roberto Laserna, Pinghan Liang, Roberto Ricciuti, Stergios Skaperdas, Caleb Stroup, Karl Wärneryd, Sam Whitt, Ben Zissimos

    • Hardcover $45.00 £38.00