Benjamin M. Compaine

Benjamin M. Compaine is Senior Research Affiliate at the Internet and Telecoms Convergence Consortium at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is the editor of The Digital Divide: Facing a Crisis or Creating a Myth? (MIT Press, 2001) and coauthor of Who Owns the Media?

  • Communications Policy in Transition

    Communications Policy in Transition

    The Internet and Beyond

    Benjamin M. Compaine and Shane Greenstein

    A collection of research reports on policy issues involving telecommunications, particularly the Internet.

    Until the 1980s, it was presumed that technical change in most communications services could easily be monitored from centralized state and federal agencies. This presumption was long outdated prior to the commercialization of the Internet. With the Internet, the long-forecast convergence of voice, video, and text bits became a reality. Legislation, capped by the Telecommunications Act of 1996, created new quasi-standards such as "fair" and "reasonable" for the FCC and courts to apply, leading to nonstop litigation and occasional gridlock. This book addresses some of the many telecommunications areas on which public policy makers, corporate strategists, and social activists must reach agreement. Topics include the regulation of access, Internet architecture in a commercial era, communications infrastructure development, the Digital Divide, and information policy issues such as intellectual property and the retransmission of TV programming via the Internet.

    • Hardcover $58.00 £48.00
    • Paperback $50.00 £40.00
  • The Digital Divide

    The Digital Divide

    Facing a Crisis or Creating a Myth?

    Benjamin M. Compaine

    This book presents data supporting the existence of a gap–along racial, economic, ethnic, and education lines–between those who have access to the latest information technologies and those who do not.

    The Digital Divide refers to the perceived gap between those who have access to the latest information technologies and those who do not. If we are indeed in an Information Age, then not having access to this information is an economic and social handicap. Some people consider the Digital Divide to be a national crisis, while others consider it an over-hyped nonissue. This book presents data supporting the existence of such a divide in the 1990s along racial, economic, ethnic, and education lines. But it also presents evidence that by 2000 the gaps are rapidly closing without substantive public policy initiatives and spending. Together, the contributions serve as a sourcebook on this controversial issue.

    • Paperback $35.00 £28.00
  • The Internet Upheaval

    The Internet Upheaval

    Raising Questions, Seeking Answers in Communications Policy

    Ingo Vogelsang and Benjamin M. Compaine

    Exploring how information technologies, in particular the Internet, are upending fundamental economic and social structures.

    At the beginning of 2000, the U.S. economy was enjoying the longest period of sustained growth and economic prosperity in its history. According to The Internet Upheaval, part of the explanation for this phenomenon is a consequence of how information technologies, in particular the Internet, are upending fundamental economic and social structures. These research studies explore some of the telecommunications policy ramifications of this upheaval. The first section addresses the complexities of adapting the First Amendment to the Internet, the debate over the taxation of e-commerce, and Internet users' attitudes toward online privacy. The second section looks at how the Internet has changed, or will change, traditional models used by economists, sociologists, and others to explain how the world works. The third section discusses the need for new economic models to deal with the rapidly changing competitive landscape. Finally, the fourth section examines economic and policy aspects of universal service.

    Contributors Mark S. Ackerman, James C. Brent, Barbara A. Cherry, Benjamin M. Compaine, Lorrie Faith Cranor, Irina Dmitrieva, Robert S. Gazzale, Austan Goolsbee, Shane Greenstein, R. Glenn Hubbard, Jed Kelko, Steven G. Lanning, William Lehr, Douglas Lichtman, Jeffrey K. MacKie-Mason, Paul Milgrom, Bridger Mitchell, Geoffrey Myers, W. Russell Neuman, Shawn R. O'Donnell, Joseph Reagle, Michael Riordan, Juan F. Riveros, Gregory L. Rosston, Padmanabhan Srinagesh, Linda O. Valenty, Bradley S. Wimmer

    • Hardcover $12.75 £10.99
  • The Information Resources Policy Handbook

    The Information Resources Policy Handbook

    Research for the Information Age

    Benjamin M. Compaine and William H. Read

    To understand the Information Age one must understand the concept of information as a resource. Like other basic resources such as energy and materials, information resources are building blocks of society. But unlike energy and materials, they are far more abundant and versatile. Information resources includes computers, telecommunications, the mass media, and financial services, all created or changed by the movement from analog to digital. This collection looks at the factors underlying digital technologies as well as the resulting public and strategic policy issues.In a rapidly evolving discipline, certain judgments are likely to change. To strike a balance between the more abstract concepts of enduring value and writings focused on current examples, each part of the book opens with a timeless "evergreen" chapter, followed by one or more "contemporary" chapters.

    Contributors Daniel Bell, Anne Wells Branscomb, Benjamin M. Compaine, Derrick C. Huang, Martin C. Libicki, Patricia Hirl Longstaff, Robert Lucky, John F. McLaughlin, Lee McKnight, Vincent Mosco, W. Russell Neuman, Eli Noam, Anthony G. Oettinger, Ithiel deSola Pool, William H. Read, Jerome S. Rubin, Richard J. Solomon, Debra Spar, Ronald Alan Weiner, Janet Wikler

    • Hardcover $80.00 £65.00
    • Paperback $80.00 £65.00