Brian Kahin

Brian Kahin is Senior Fellow at the Computer & Communications Industry Association in Washington, DC. He is also Research Investigator and Adjunct Professor at the University of Michigan School of Information and a special advisor to the Provost's Office. He is a coeditor of Transforming Enterprise (MIT Press, 2004) and many other books.

  • Advancing Knowledge and The Knowledge Economy

    Advancing Knowledge and The Knowledge Economy

    Brian Kahin and Dominique Foray

    The revolution in information technology transforms not only information and its uses but, more important, knowledge and the ways we generate and manage it. Knowledge is now seen as input, output, and capital, even if imperfectly accounted for or understood. Many businesses and public agencies are convinced that knowledge can be managed in sophisticated, rational ways and that networking and information technology are essential tools for doing so. In this collection, experts from North America and Europe look at the transformation of knowledge in the global economy in light of the rapid changes in information technology, the resulting explosion of data, the recognition of intangibles as sources of value and liability, and the increasingly blurred distinction between private and public knowledge. The appeal of the Internet as boundary-spanning knowledge infrastructure, bridging all sectors of the economy, is shadowed by another infrastructure of rights-based contracts, practices, and institutions. The contributors address the ways in which the processes for creating and organizing knowledge interact with information technology, business strategy, and changing social and economic conditions. They discuss the balkanization that results from the complexity of the knowledge economy, the variety of knowledge resources, the great diversity of institutional and market contexts, and competing models of control and cooperation—and of proprietary and non-proprietary knowledge.

    Contributors Berglind Ásgeirsdóttir, Carliss Y. Baldwin, Kim B. Clark, Iain M. Cockburn, Patrick Cohendet, Robin Cowan, Paul A. David, Jan Fagerberg, Brian Fitzgerald, Dominque Foray, Peter A. Freeman, Fred Gault, Dietmar Harhoff, Margaret Hedstrom, C. Suzanne Iacono, Brian Kahin, John Leslie King, Kurt Larsen, Josh Lerner, Bengt-Åke Lundvall, David C. Mowery, Arti K. Rai, Bhaven Sampat, Martin Schaaper, Tom Schuller, W. Edward Steinmueller, Stefan Thomke, Jean Tirole, Reinhilde Veugelers, Stéphan Vincent-Lancrin, Eric von Hippel, Andrew Wyckoff

    • Hardcover $17.75
    • Paperback $40.00
  • Coordinating the Internet

    Coordinating the Internet

    Brian Kahin and James H. Keller

    For years, the world saw the Internet as a creature of theU.S. Department of Defense. Now some claim that the Internet is aself-governing organism controlled by no one and needing nooversight. Although the National Science Foundation and othergovernment agencies continue to support and oversee criticaladministrative and coordinating functions, the Internet is remarkablydecentralized and uninstitutionalized. As it grows in scope,bandwidth, and functionality, the Internet will require greatercoordination, but it is not yet clear what kind of coordinatingmechanisms will evolve. The essays in this volume clarify these issues and suggest possiblemodels for governing the Internet. The topics addressed range fromsettlements and statistics collection to the sprawling problem ofdomain names, which affects the commercial interests of millions ofcompanies around the world. One recurrent theme is the inseparabilityof technical and policy issues in any discussion involving theInternet.

    Contributors Guy Almes, Ashley Andeen, Joseph P. Bailey, Steven M. Bellovin, ScottBradner, Richard Cawley, Che-Hoo Cheng, Bilal Chinoy, K Claffy, MariaFarnon, William Foster, Alexander Gigante, Sharon Eisner Gillett, MarkGould, Eric Hoffman, Scott Huddle, Joseph Y. Hui, David R. Johnson, Mitchell Kapor, John Lesley King, Lee W. McKnight, Don Mitchell, Tracie Monk, Milton Mueller, Carl Oppedahl, David G.Post, YakovRekhter, Paul Resnick, A. M. Rutkowski, Timothy J. Salo, PhilipL. Sbarbaro, Robert Shaw.

    A publication of the Harvard Information Infrastructure Project

    • Paperback $45.00
  • Borders in Cyberspace

    Borders in Cyberspace

    Information Policy and the Global Information Infrastructure

    Brian Kahin and Charles Nesson

    Today millions of technologically empowered individuals are able to participate freely in international transactions and enterprises, social and economic. These activities are governed by national and local laws designed for simpler times and now challenged by a new technological and market environment as well as by the practicalities and politics of enforcement across national boundaries. Borders in Cyberspace investigates issues arising from national differences in law, public policy, and social and cultural values as these differences are reformulated in the emerging global information infrastructure. The contributions include detailed analyses of some of the most visible issues, including intellectual property, security, privacy, and censorship.

    • Hardcover $66.00
    • Paperback $8.75

Contributor

  • The Historiography of Modern Architecture

    The Historiography of Modern Architecture

    Panayotis Tournikiotis

    The history of modern architecture as constructed by historians and key texts.

    Writing, according to Panayotis Tournikiotis, has always exerted a powerful influence on architecture. Indeed, the study of modern architecture cannot be separated from a fascination with the texts that have tried to explain the idea of a new architecture in a new society. During the last forty years, the question of the relationship of architecture to its history—of buildings to books—has been one of the most important themes in debates about the course of modern architecture.

    Tournikiotis argues that the history of modern architecture tends to be written from the present, projecting back onto the past our current concerns, so that the "beginning" of the story really functions as a "representation" of its end. In this book the buildings are the quotations, while the texts are the structure.

    Tournikiotis focuses on a group of books by major historians of the twentieth century: Nikolaus Pevsner, Emil Kaufmann, Sigfried Giedion, Bruno Zevi, Leonardo Benevolo, Henry-Russell Hitchcock, Reyner Banham, Peter Collins, and Manfredo Tafuri. In examining these writers' thoughts, he draws on concepts from critical theory, relating architecture to broader historical models.

    • Hardcover $17.75
    • Paperback $45.00
  • The First 100 Feet

    The First 100 Feet

    Options for Internet and Broadband Access

    Deborah Hurley and James H. Keller

    The growth of the Internet has been propelled in significant part by user investment in infrastructure: computers, internal wiring, and the connection to the Internet provider. This "bottom-up" investment minimizes the investment burden facing providers. New technologies such as wireless and data transmission over power lines, as well as deregulation of telecommunications and electric utilities, will provide new opportunities for user investment in intelligent infrastructure as leverage points for Internet and broadband access. Recasting the "problem of the last 100 feet" as "the opportunity of the first 100 feet," this book challenges individuals, businesses, and policymakers to rethink fundamental issues in telecommunications policy. The contributors look at options for Internet and broadband access from the perspective of homeowners, apartment complexes, and small businesses. They evaluate the opportunities and obstacles for bottom-up infrastructure development and the implications for traditional and alternative providers at the neighborhood, regional, and national levels. Already, some argue that Internet service will become the common denominator platform on which all other services can be carried. A Publication of the Harvard Information Infrastructure Project.

    • Paperback $35.00
  • Converging Infrastructures

    Converging Infrastructures

    Lewis M. Branscomb and James H. Keller

    This collection explores the opportunities for and possible implications of coordination between two of the major pieces of emerging infrastructure in the United States: Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) and the National Information Infrastructure (NII).

    This collection explores the opportunities for and possible implications of coordination between two of the major pieces of emerging infrastructure in the United States: Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) and the National Information Infrastructure (NII). Based on a recent workshop that was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Transportation, MIT, and Harvard, Converging Infrastructures frames the programmatic, organizational, and technical issues involved.

    • Hardcover $52.50
    • Paperback $40.00