Brian Wallis

Brian Wallis is a senior editor of Art in America.

  • Julia Scher

    Julia Scher

    Always There

    Caroline Schneider and Brian Wallis

    Always There offers a comprehensive survey of American artist Julia Scher's work. The artist's installations and performances have always featured a complex relation to techno-social control, demonstrating our complicity in the proliferating technologies used to surveil both our physical and virtual identities. As Brian Wallis writes in his introduction, “Scher's work breaks linguistic codes of security, analyzing the rhetorics of surveillance discourse to allow the savvy user to manipulate and reconstitute those 'bits'. This approach is... akin to that of hackers, who, like Scher, invert the notion of usability, turning the practical on its head. On one level, this radical reversibility undoubtedly stems from some fundamental technoskepticism, but it also shows the artist's more complicated skepticism about the visual and geographical determinants of contemporary space and how they impact the practices of everyday life.”

    The texts discuss how in the aftermath of 9-11, issues of surveillance, data harvesting and scoptophilia have acquired a new meaning. According to author Andrew Ross, “Scher is a wholly political artist with a keen eye and ear for the iconography and poetry of power, especially when it crystallizes into the operational jargon of aggressive intelligence systems.”

    Contributors Bill Horrigan, Andrew Hultkrans, Giovanni Intra, Avital Ronell, Andrew Ross

    • Paperback $14.95
  • Rock My Religion

    Rock My Religion

    Writings and Projects 1965-1990

    Dan Graham and Brian Wallis

    Rock My Religion collects eighteen of Graham's essays from all periods of his work, beginning with his essays on minimalist artists such as Dan Flavin and Donald Judd, continuing with his writings on punk rock and popular culture, and concluding with his more recent considerations of architecture, urban space, and power.

    Dan Graham's artworks and critical writings have had an enormous influence on the course of contemporary art over the past quarter century. Rock My Religion collects eighteen of Graham's essays from all periods of his work, beginning with his essays on minimalist artists such as Dan Flavin and Donald Judd, continuing with his writings on punk rock and popular culture, and concluding with his more recent considerations of architecture, urban space, and power.

    Alternating with these theoretical essays are descriptions and documentations of Graham's own works and installations—projects that trace his explorations in conceptual art, video, photography, architecture, and public sculpture, showing the integral connections between Graham's criticism and his own artwork. Although as an artist Graham has been associated with minimalism, conceptual art, and postmodernism, his writing does not conform to the stylistic and theoretical constraints of any specific movement. With sources and topics ranging from Ronald Reagan to the Sex Pistols, from Michel Foucault to Dean Martin, Graham's eclectic investigations into the complex cultural relationships between art production and social reality are always strikingly original. What makes these writings particularly astonishing, though, is Graham's willingness to examine specific manifestations of popular culture (television, magazines, rock and roll, drugs) without regard to traditional qualitative judgments and without separating "high" or "low" culture from the processes of everyday life.

    • Hardcover $37.50 £30.00
    • Paperback $24.95 £20.00
  • Modern Dreams

    The Rise and Fall and Rise of Pop

    Brian Wallis, Tom Finkelpearl, and Patricia C. Phillips

    Modern Dreams explores the distinction between the theoretical and sociological production of London in the fifties and conceptually related work of New York in the eighties. The art objects and theoretical strategies presented by the artists, architects, and writers included in this book engage in a continuing, questioning struggle with the means and ends of presentation and representation, focusing in particular on the effects of media images in photographs and on television. Modern Dreams pursues the transformation of images of popular culture into meaningful icons of contemporary society on four fronts. It begins by investigating the Independent Group's landmark exhibition "This is Tomorrow Today" held at the Whitechapel Gallery in London in 1956 as proto-Pop; examines the utilization of art related technology and imagery as a kind of agit-Pop of the streets; explores the theoretical ramifications, qualified accomplishments, and possibilities of archi-Pop; and discusses the self referential, picture oriented production of post-Pop. A conversation among the Americans who were instrumental in defining Pop interprets the impact, of the British "proto-Pop" group on emerging American Pop artists, and provides a revealing look at some of the issues at stake, in the mass media environment that informs the work of artists of the 1980s.

    Distributed for the P.S. 1 Museum, The Institute for Art and Urban Resources. Essays by Dennis Adams, Lawrence Alloway, Reyner Banham, Judith Barry, Thomas Finkelpearl, Kenneth Frampton, Richard Hamilton, Dick Hebdige, Thomas Lawson, Patricia Phillips, Alison and Peter Smithson, Eugenie Tsai, Brian Wallis, Glenn Weiss, Krzysztof WodiczkoA conversation with Alanna Heiss, Leo Castelli, Claes Oldenburg, Roy Lichtenstein, John Coplans, Betsey Johnson

    • Hardcover $40.00
    • Paperback $25.00